Customer Service Job Posting, Shawnee National Forest

“Caring for the Land and Serving People”

SHAWNEE NATIONAL FOREST

OUTREACH NOTICE

Customer Service Representative
GS-0303-5

The Shawnee National Forest will soon be advertising a GS-0303-5
Customer Service Representative position. The position is a permanent
full-time appointment, with a duty station in Jonesboro, IL. The
purpose of this Outreach Notice is to inform prospective applicants of
this opportunity.

Anyone interested is encouraged to complete the attached
Outreach Response Form. You will still need to apply for the job separately.
Please reply to this outreach by July16, 2012.

THE POSITION
The position is located in Jonesboro, Illinois and will serve as the
Customer Service Representative (CSR) for the office. The incumbent
will be responsible in responding to routine inquiries from various
customers and employees in support of the overall operations of the
unit. They will assist in greeting visitors, answering telephones and
providing information to both the public and other employees. The
Customer Services Representative must be able to issue permits and
process payments for maps, permits or other goods or services. The
CSR will be expected to maintain a government purchase card and will
have check-writing authority. The CSR maintains displays in front
desk areas and will be called upon to present basic interpretive
programs at local venues.

The incumbent will be responsible to perform assignments involving a
variety of topics by obtaining the material and assembling the data
into a report and presentation format. The CSR will be expected to
monitor the administrative facilities and performance on basic service
contracts for office cleaning and grounds maintenance.

The incumbent will be responsible to keep apprised of Agency-wide
directives and procedures and any new requirements affecting the work
of the organization. They will prepare and process correspondence,
reports, and filing in various databases. Assignments may include
regularly scheduled work on weekends. The beginning salary for the
position is approximately $31,315 per year.

APPLICATION PROCESS

This position will be posted on www.usajobs.gov and applications will
be processed through an on-line applicant assessment system that has
been specifically configured for the USDA Forest Service.

DESCRIPTION OF THE FOREST:

While not large, at 280,000 acres, the Shawnee National Forest in
southern Illinois is the largest unit of public land in the state.
The Supervisor’s Office is located in Harrisburg, with a Ranger
Station in Vienna and a Work Center in Jonesboro. The Forest sits at
the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. The area is rich
in history, reflecting the pioneer movement of Americans into the
west. The Forest is predominantly oak-hickory, although pine was
planted in many areas in the past. Swamps contain tupelo and cypress
communities. Razorback ridges associated with the Ozark upthrust are
found on the west side of the Forest; the broader ridges associated
with the Shawnee hills are found on the east side of the Forest. The
Wisconsin glacier stopped north of the Shawnee, so the Grand Prairie
(and its corn fields) most associated with the state of Illinois
starts 40 miles north of the Forest.

Within the boundaries of the Shawnee National Forest System Land include:
• Seven Congressionally-designated Wilderness Areas (over 10% of the Forest)
• Six candidate Wild and Scenic Rivers
• Four National Natural Landmarks
• Four heritage resource sites on the National Register of Historic Places.
• 10 Research Natural Areas
• 58 ecological areas
• 2 geological areas
• 14 botanical areas

The Forest is within a day’s drive (350 miles) of more than 45 million
people, or 17% of the U.S. population. (U.S. Census Bureau, 7-1-97
estimate)
Additional information about the Shawnee National Forest may be found
at www.fs.fed.us/r9/shawnee.

CLIMATE

We experience all four seasons, with an average of 3” of snow per year
and temperatures rarely below 0 degrees. Summer days are sunny and
humid with highs in the 80’s – 90’s, occasionally topping 100. Spring
weather can occur in March and fall weather can extend into November.
During the spring and fall seasons, the climate and beauty of the area
is especially compelling. Spring brings an abundance of blooming
dogwoods, redbuds and wildflowers. The fall is saturated with color,
as the leaves turn brilliant reds, gold and yellows. Garden of the
Gods, the most visited site on the Forest, is a must-see during the
fall color season. The unusual rock formations, coupled with the
surrounding Garden of the Gods Wilderness, portray the beauty of
southern Illinois at its finest.

EDUCATION

Pre-schools through high schools can be found in most communities and
rank high in the state. There are several community colleges in the
area offering quite reasonable in-district tuition. The Southern
Illinois University, located in Carbondale, IL, offers a full range of
baccalaureate through doctoral programs. Day care facilities also are
available in most communities.

CHURCHES

Churches representing all major denominations can be found in most communities.

ECONOMY

Real estate here is moderately priced. The median price for
purchasing a home is approximately $85,000 and house rentals begins at
approximately $350 per month. Utilities are priced moderately.
Tourism is a developing economic force in the area. In recent years
several wineries have opened, offering two outstanding wine trails.
Southern Illinois offers a rural environment with easy access to all
possible amenities. Both shopping and entertainment opportunities are
abundant within the area. Marion and Carbondale, IL along with
Paducah, KY offer shopping malls, movie theaters and several locally
owned and operated restaurants, along with major chain and fast-food
restaurants. Additional information on local employment opportunities
can be found at the following links:

http://www.manta.com/mb?search=Harrisburg+il

http://www.manta.com/mb?search=Marion+il

HEALTH CARE

Health care facilities serving the area include full facility
Carbondale Doctor’s Memorial Hospital and Marion Memorial Hospital.
Services at these hospitals include cardiac units, oncology and
neonatal units. Other hospitals providing care are Lourdes and
Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah, KY and Massac Memorial Hospital
in Metropolis, IL. All the hospitals provide 24-hour emergency room
physician coverage and specialists.

RECREATIONAL AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

Every June, the annual Southern Illinois Music Festival features
dozens of performances in venues from Mt. Vernon to Cairo and
Murphysboro to Marion and of course Southern Illinois University in
Carbondale, Illinois, the heart of the Festival. Musicians from
throughout North and South America, Europe and Asia perform orchestral
and chamber music, opera, ballet, jazz, and new music, in an informal
and inviting atmosphere. Visit http://www.sifest.com/ for more
information.

The Superman Celebration in downtown Metropolis, IL features the Home
of Superman. This event held during the second weekend in June each
year celebrates the ‘Man of Steel’. A Superman Drama kicks off the
weekend of contests, food and fun. Comic book & artist show, fan
films, street vendors, a carnival and a Super Car Show. Visit
http://www.supermancelebration.net/ for more information.
The Big Muddy Film Festival, the longest-running, student-organized
film festival in the United States happens annually in Carbondale at
Southern Illinois University.

For an urban atmosphere, events such as the annual Mary Meachum
Freedom Crossing Celebration and the Big Muddy Blues Festival in St.
Louis, MO and the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration and Latin
Dance Festival, Nashville, TN provide glimpse of the cultural
diversity within a two hour commute from Southern Illinois.

There are wide varieties of diverse cultural and educational events in
the area. One is the Tokyo String Quartet founded some four decades
ago. It has been captivating audiences ever since and gaining high
regard as a chamber ensemble in its own right. In collaboration with
a wide variety of artists and composers it is creating a significant
collection of acclaimed recordings. For families in the Muslim
community, there are events and activities available including an
Islamic summer school for children of all ages.

There are a number of festivals located in the area. The annual
Festival Latino at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale offers the
chance to experience Latino culture with free food, entertainment and
fun activities. The Southern Illinois Saluki Pow-Wow hosted by SIUC
provides people of all ages and backgrounds to enjoy traditional
Native American arts, crafts, foods, cultural demonstrations,
exhibitions and dances. The Southern Illinois Irish Festival provides
Irish-themed activities, food, events, entertainment and live music.
The Herrinfesta Italiana takes place each spring in Herrin, IL
celebrating the town’s Italian heritage. For more information about
festivals in the area, please visit:
http://www.oneregion.com/travelguide/stories/text_12.html.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in
all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national
origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status,
familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation,
genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or
part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance
program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons
with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202)720-2600 (voice and TDD). To
file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of
Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC
20250-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD).
USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

OUTREACH RESPONSE FORM

If you are interested in this position, be sure to submit your
application through USAJobs when it is advertised. In addition, you
are encouraged to complete this form and reply to Monica Neal by July
16, 2012 in one of three ways:

E-mail: monicaneal@fs.fed.us. Fax: (618) 253-1063
Mail: Monica Neal
Shawnee National Forest
50 Hwy 145 S.
Harrisburg, IL 62946

For additional details on the position, you may call Daryl Kirtley at
(618) 658-2111.

By completing this form, you are indicating that you are interested in
the following position:

• Customer Service Representative, GS-0303-5, Permanent Full-Time position

Location:
• Region 9, Shawnee National Forest, Jonesboro, Illinois

PERSONAL INFORMATION:

Name Date
Address
City State
Zip E-Mail
Phone number(s)
Are you currently a federal employee
If Yes, current agency and location
current title/series/grade
Type of Appointment Permanent Term Temporary
Type of Schedule Full-time Part-time Intermittent
If you are not a current permanent (career or career conditional)
employee, are you eligible for appointment under any of the following
special authorities (check the appropriate box):
Person with Disabilities
Veteran Readjustment
Former Peace Corps Volunteer
Disabled Veteran with 30% Compensable Disability
Student Career Experience Program
Veterans Employment Opportunities Act 0f 1998
Other, please describe:

Fire Handcrew Job Openings, Shawnee National Forest

(Handcrew)
Camel Rock
Garden-of-the-Gods

Introduction

The Shawnee National Forest will soon be filling several temporary
GS-0462-3/4/5, NTE 1039 hours Forestry Aid/Technician (Handcrew)
positions. These are arduous positions. The positions are located on
the Hidden Springs Ranger District with the actual duty location in
Murphysboro, Illinois. The work season runs from October through
April with a break in December. The nationwide vacancies are located
on the web at www.usajobs.opm.gov and are now open. The announcement
numbers are: OCRT-0462-3-FIRE-DT, OCRT-0462-4-HANDCREW-DT, and
OCRT-462-5-HANDCREW-DT-REL2. The primary purpose of these positions
is to perform wildland fire suppression/management/control as a
specialized firefighter with responsibility for the operation and
maintenance of specialized tools and equipment. Other wildland fire
related duties may involve fire prevention, patrol, detection, or
prescribed burning. The incumbents may be assigned into one or more
types of positions within the wildfire program where the individual’s
specialized skills are required. Come join our team and help make a
difference.

Duties

For GS-3 – Serves as a member of a fire crew assigned to suppress the
full range of wildland fires. Performs assignments as a wildland
firefighter in developing a working knowledge of fire suppression and
fuels management techniques, practices and terminology. This consists
of fireline construction, use of pumps and engines, hose lays using
appropriate nozzles and nozzle adjustments in the effective use of
water and additives, working in and around aircraft such as
helicopters, safety rules and basic fire behavior.

For GS-4 – Serves as a skilled crewmember on a hand crew assigned to
suppress a full range of difficult and complex wildland fires and
prescribed fires. Utilizes a variety of specialized tools, equipment,
and techniques while actively suppressing wildfires, such as a
pulaski, shovel, McLeod, ax and chainsaw to control the spread of
wildfire. Performs basic fireline activities such as line
construction, lopping and scattering of fuels using hand tools, along
with holding, patrolling, monitoring, and mop-up operations. Moves
dirt, chops brush, removes small trees, etc. to construct fire line.
Crewmember is responsible for observing the rules of wildland
firefighting safety and applying practices and techniques to minimize
resource damage.

For GS-5 – Serves as an experienced firefighter and work leader on a
hand crew or other related fire crews performing fire suppression
and/or fuels management duties under the most adverse conditions of
climate, fuels, and terrain. Performs the duties of a fully qualified
chain saw operator and chainsaw repair technician. Performs all
aspects of wildland and prescribed fire operations including
preparation, ignition, monitoring, holding, and mop up. Collects fire
weather data. Responsible for operation and maintenance of specialized
equipment used to respond to wildland and prescribed fire situations.
Participates in wildland fire and safety training in the techniques,
practices, and methods of fire suppression and in the safe, efficient
operation and use of tools, equipment, and vehicles used in fireline
activities, with emphasis on those used in the particular function
assigned.

Work Capacity Test (WCT) for wildland firefighters: This position
participates in wildland firefighting activities. Based on the type
of work performed. Taking and passing the WCT at the arduous level is
a “condition of employment.” The arduous fitness (Pack) Test consist
of a three (3) mile hike, within forty-five (45) minutes, while
carrying a forty-five (45) pound pack.

Description of Forest

At 280,000 acres, the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois is
the largest unit of public land in the state. The Supervisor’s Office
is located in Harrisburg, with Ranger Districts in Vienna and
Jonesboro. The Forest sits at the confluence of the Mississippi and
Ohio Rivers. The area is rich in history, reflecting the pioneer
movement of Americans into the west. The Forest is predominantly
oak-hickory, although pine was planted in many areas in the past. The
razorback ridges associated with the Ozark upthrust are found on the
west side of the Forest. The broader ridges associated with the
Shawnee hills are found on the east side of the Forest. The Wisconsin
glacier stopped north of the Shawnee, so the flat grand prairie (and
its corn fields) more associated with the state of Illinois starts 40
to 60 miles north of the Shawnee.

Additional information about the forest may be found at
www.fs.fed.us/r9/shawnee.

The Community

Murphysboro is located in Jackson County, population is around 12,000
residents. Murphysboro has a wide selection of restaurants, as well
as 2 grocery stores, a Wal-mart, and other amenities as needed. Some
rental housing is available in Murphysboro for short term leases. It
is located just west of the town of Carbondale where Southern Illinois
University is located; Carbondale also has a wide variety of stores
and restaurants, as well as rental properties available for short
terms.

Recreational and Cultural Opportunities

Recreational opportunities abound on the Shawnee. Hiking, hunting,
camping, biking, fishing (including several fishing tournaments) and
horseback riding are some of the recreational opportunities available.
The River-to-River Trail runs from the Mississippi River to the Ohio
River and crosses both the Forest and private properties. The Shawnee
contains a portion of the Ohio River National Scenic Byway. This
Byway is approximately 400 miles in length, runs from the
Ohio/Pennsylvania border to the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi
Rivers and crosses three national forests. There are seven
congressionally designated wildernesses on the Shawnee, which provide
both solitude and scenic beauty. There are a large number of
community festivals held in southern Illinois from the Apple Festival
in Murphysboro, to Festival Italiano in Herrin, to the Deer Festival
in Golconda, to Barbecue on the River in Paducah, KY. Golf courses
and tennis courts are available in many communities.

Climate

We experience all 4 seasons, with an average of 3” snow per year and
temperature rarely below 0 degrees. Summer days are sunny and humid
with highs in the 80’s – 90’s, occasionally topping 100. Spring
weather can occur in March and fall weather can extend into November.
During the spring and fall seasons, the climate and beauty of the area
is especially compeling. Spring brings an abundance of blooming
dogwoods, redbuds, and wildflowers. The fall is saturated with color,
as the leaves turn brilliant reds, golds, and yellows. Garden of the
Gods, the most visited site on the Forest, is a must-see during the
fall color season. The unusual rock formations, coupled with the
surrounding Garden of the Gods Wilderness, is Mother Nature at her
finest.

Education

Pre-schools through high schools can be found in most communities and
rank high in the state. There are several community colleges in the
area offering quite reasonable in-district tuition. Southern Illinois
University in Carbondale, IL offers a full range of baccalaureate
through doctorate programs. Day care facilities are also available in
most communities.

Churches

Churches representing all major denominations can be found in most communities.

Economy

Real estate here is moderately priced. The median price for
purchasing a home is approximately $85,000 and house rentals begin at
approximately $350 per month. Utilities are priced moderately.
Tourism is a developing economic force in the area. In recent years
several wineries have opened, offering two outstanding wine trails.
Southern Illinois offers a rural environment with easy access to all
possible amentities. Both shopping and entertainment opportunities are
abundant within the area. Marion, Carbondale, and Paducah offer
shopping malls, movie theaters, and several locally owned and operated
restaurants, along with major chain and fast-food restaurants.

Health Care

Health care facilities serving the area include full facility
Carbondale Doctor’s Memorial Hospital and Marion Memorial Hospital.
Services at these hospitals include cardiac units, oncology, and
neonatal units. Other hospitals providing care are Lourdes and
Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah. All the hospitals provide
24-hour emergency room physician coverage and specialists.

For further information about the duties, please contact Forest
Paukert, Supervisory Fire Engine Operator at 618-658-2111. For
information about the community, please contact Daryl Kirtley, Support
Services Specialist at 618-658-2111.

This outreach notice is to identify potential candidates to determine
the area of consideration. FOREST SERVICE EMPLOYEES ON THE WORKFORCE
REDUCTION AND PLACEMENT LIST WILL RECEIVE PRIORITY CONSIDERATION AND
CTAP/ICTAP ELIGIBLES WILL RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE CONSIDERATION. If
you are interested in applying for this position, please respond on
the enclosed Outreach Notice Form by July 6, 2012.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in
all of its programs and activities on the basis of race, color,
national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex (including
gender identity and expression), marital status, familial status,
parental status, religion, sexual orientation, political beliefs,
genetic information, reprisal, or because all or part of an
individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program.
(Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with
disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write to:
USDA
Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Stop 9410
Washington, DC 20250-9410

Or call toll-free at (866) 632-9992 (English) or (800) 877-8339 (TDD)
or (866) 377-8642 (English Federal-relay) or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish
Federal-relay). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

OUTREACH RESPONSE FORM

If you are interested in these positions, be sure to submit your
application through USAJobs when it is advertised. In addition, you
are encouraged to complete this form and reply to Monica Neal by
July 6, 2012 in one of three ways:

E-mail: monicaneal@fs.fed.us. Fax: (618) 253-1063
Mail: Monica Neal
Shawnee National Forest
50 Hwy 145 S
Harrisburg, IL 62946

For additional details on the position, you may call Forest Paukert at
(618) 658-2111

By completing this form, you are indicating that you are interested in
the following positions, please place an “X” in the position(s) you
are interested in:

• _____Forestry Aid – Fire, GS-0462-3 (OCRT-0462-3-FIRE-DT) 1039
seasonal position
• _____Forestry Technician – Handcrew, GS-0462-4
(OCRT-0462-4-HANDCREW-DT) 1039 seasonal position
• _____Forestry Technician – Handcrew, GS-0462-5
(OCRT-0462-5-HANDCREW-DT-REL2) 1039 seasonal position

Location:
• Region 9, Shawnee National Forest, Murphysboro Work Center in
Murphysboro, Illinois.

PERSONAL INFORMATION:
Name Date
Address
City State
Zip E-Mail
Phone number(s)
Are you currently a federal employee
If Yes, current agency and location
current title/series/grade
Type of Appointment if Current Government Employee Permanent Term Temporary
Type of Schedule if Government Employee Full-time Part-time Intermittent
If you are not a current permanent (career or career conditional)
employee, are you eligible for appointment under any of the following
special authorities (check the appropriate box):
Person with Disabilities
Veteran Readjustment
Former Peace Corps Volunteer
Disabled Veteran with 30% Compensable Disability
Student Career Experience Program
Veterans Employment Opportunities Act 0f 1998
Other, please describe:

Natural Resource Specialist: Recreation Job Opening,

Visit our Website at http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/cnnf/

Outreach and Notice of Announcement

Natural Resource Specialist
Recreation
GS-401-11

Permanent

Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

Organizational Level – Eagle River/Florence Ranger District

Duty Station
Eagle River, Wisconsin

Opening Date: 6/18/2012
Closing Date: 7/9/2012

The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest is announcing an upcoming
vacancy for a Natural Resource Specialist, Recreation GS-401-11
position. This is a Permanent appointment with a Full-time tour of
duty.

The position: This Assistant Ranger position serves as a direct
assistant to the ranger, providing leadership in a broad range of
programs and issues affecting the district and forest, both
independently as well as a member of the district leadership team.
On a regular basis, this position serves as acting district ranger.
This position directly supervises 1 permanent full time employee and
oversees the district recreation staff which includes 2 permanent full
time employees, 4-5 seasonal employees, volunteers, and interns. The
Recreation Management program includes the planning, management,
budgeting, and administration of a mixed program of developed
campgrounds, dispersed camping sites, boat landings, trail heads,
motorized, ski, horse, and other non motorized trail systems, National
Historic Register structures, recreation and other special uses, and
roads management. Program leadership involves frequent partnerships
and coordination with local governments, user groups, schools,
chambers of commerce, and other agencies.

Other Information of Interest:
The area of consideration is Government wide and External DEMO.

One position will be advertised.

In addition to the duty station city, work will be performed at Florence, WI.

The work schedule is Maxiflex; occasional weekend or overtime work may
be required.

Travel is required occassionally and/or overnight.

Transfer of station benefits for existing federal employees are
allowed per FSH 6509.33.

Transfer of station benefits are not provided under the DEMO announcement.

Welcome to the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest!
The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest is located in Wisconsin’s
“Northwoods,” covering over a million and a half acres of forested
lands in the north central section of the “Badger” state. The Forest
operates out of nine District Offices and a Supervisor’s Office in
Rhinelander, Wis.
Where is the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest?
The forest is comprised of more than 1.5 million acres in 11 northern
Wisconsin counties and 65 townships. It is part of the treaty-ceded
areas for 11 Indian tribes that retain hunting, fishing and gathering
rights on national forest lands. Other lands within the Forest’s
boundaries include more than 1,200 separate parcels owned by the
Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands, the State of
Wisconsin, industrial forest land and privately owned properties.
Interspersed around National Forest lands are more than 2.5 million
acres of publicly owned properties and state and county and forests.
This mix of public and private lands offers many opportunities for
collaboration and partnerships.

The Chequamegon portion of the forest includes about 858,400 acres in
Ashland, Bayfield, Sawyer, Price, Taylor, and Vilas counties. In the
east, the Nicolet side covers nearly 661,400 acres in Florence,
Forest, Langlade, Oconto, Oneida, and Vilas counties.

The two forests, established in the early 1930s, were combined into
the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in February 1998.

The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest stretches across northern
Wisconsin and provides the scenic and economic foundation for the
Northwoods communities. Glacier-carved hills and lowlands, extensive
hardwood forests, and diverse wetlands create topographic and
vegetative diversity across the Forest. With more than 2,000 lakes
and 2,000 miles of rivers and streams, the Forest is a destination for
water-based recreation. Wildlife is abundant on the Forest and
visitors are able to hunt large and small game in an unconfined
setting
The Forest’s fact sheet has some additional details.
Comfortable summers and outstanding fall colors invite visitors to
enjoy the sanctuary and scenic beauty of the Forest. Winter brings
areas of snow and opportunities to explore the depths of the Forest’s
winter wonderland. Learn more about Rhinelander’s weather.

Community Descriptions:

Eagle River District Office
1247 E. Eall St.
Eagle River, WI 54521
715-479-2827

Eagle River is a small city of 1,500 located in northeastern
Wisconsin. It’s the county seat of Vilas County – the heart of musky,
walleye and bass fishing country in Northern Wisconsin. The area
encompasses approximately 1,000 lakes, plus trout and smallmouth
streams. This area is world renown as trophy musky water.

Eagle River is also a winter wonderland. There are many snowmobile
trails linking community to community and Eagle River is proclaimed
Snowmobile Capital of the World in January as it hosts the World’s
Championship Snowmobile Derby. For 35 years, more than 300 racers and
up to 35,000 fans have come from all corners of the world to take part
in this event. There are also many miles of cross country ski trails
as well as a modern ice arena for hockey and figure skating.

As a tourist destination in northern Wisconsin, Eagle River boasts
many restaurants, resorts and shops.

Florence District Office
4793 Forestry Dr.
Florence, WI 54121
715-528-4464

Florence is the county seat of Florence County, located in far
northeastern Wisconsin. It touts itself as being the best kept secret
in Wisconsin.

There are 265 lakes and 165 miles of rivers and streams in Florence
County. The Pine and Popple Rivers are state designated “Wild
Rivers.” There are only 3 of these rivers in the state and two of
them are here in “Wild River Country.” The Pine and the Popple were
designated by Wisconsin legislature as state wild rivers in 1965 to be
protected from development and kept in a natural free-flowing
condition.

The 7,500-acre federally designated Whisker Lake Wilderness Area,
located in northern Florence County, is the second largest wilderness
area in the state. The name is derived from the majestic pines near
the shoreline of Whisker Lake. Timber cruisers from days gone by
dubbed these pine “chin whiskers”. These “chin whiskers” miraculously
escaped the Wildfires that ravaged the area after logging in the early
1900’s.

Florence County has much to offer the outdoor enthusiast – hunting,
fishing, camping, hiking, ATV trail riding, snowmobiling, skiing, and
all the other wilderness experiences that this unspoiled area has to
offer.

Additional Information:

The following individuals can provide you with additional information
on the Forest and the local duty station area.

Catherine Pinegar, Acting District Ranger, Eagle River-Florence Ranger
District, (715) 479-2827 ext 14, email: cpinegar@fs.fed.us.

OUTREACH NOTICE
APPLICANT REPLY FORM

If you are interested in this position, please complete and submit
this form to Catherine Pinegar, Acting District Ranger, Eagle
River-Florence Ranger District, cpinegar@fs.fed.us. This will help us
determine the level of interest of prospective candidates and
establish the area of consideration. Thanks for your cooperation.

Title of Outreach Position: Natural Resource Specialist (Recreation)

Name:

Email Address:

Mailing Address:

Telephone Number: Work: Home:

Agency Employed with: 0 USFS 0 Other (Please list):

Type of appointment currently under (please check one):

0 Permanent 0 Temporary 0 Term 0 Other (Please list):

Current Region/Forest/District:

Current Series and Grade:

Current Position/Title:

If not a current permanent (career or career conditional) employee,
are you eligible to be hired under any of the following special
authorities:

0 Persons with Disabilities
0 Veterans Recruitment Appointment
0 Disabled Veteran w/30% Compensable Disability
0 Veteran Employment Opportunities Act of 1998
0 Former Peace Corp Volunteer
0 Student Career Experience Program
0 Other (explain):

THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR VACANCY

Forest Timber Program Manager, Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

Visit our Website at http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/cnnf/

Outreach and Notice of Announcement

Forester (Forest Timber Program Manager)

GS-0460-11/12

Permanent

Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

Rhinelander Supervisor’s Office
500 Hanson Lake Road
Rhinelander, WI 54501
715 362-1300

Duty Station
Rhinelander, Wisconsin

Opening Date: 6/17/2012
Closing Date:7/12/2012

The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest is announcing an upcoming
vacancy for a GS 460-11/12 Forest Timber Program Manager and
Contracting Officer position. This is a permanent appointment with a
full-time tour of duty located in the Supervisors Office in
Rhinelander, Wisconsin. The forest has a large and dynamic timber sale
program and typically ranks within the top five timber producing
forests in the nation.

Major Duties
This position serves as the Forest Timber Sale Contracting Officer and
is responsible for coordination of the timber sale program including
monitoring target attainment, reviewing and approving appraisal
information, and overseeing preparation and implementation of timber
sales and land stewardship contracts. The incumbent is also
responsible for maintaining certification of the forest timber work
force and providing expertise and advice to the Line Officers and
forest staff on timber contracting issues.

Preferred Skills
Timber sale package review requires knowledge of on the ground
transportation planning, logging systems, sale preparation, and
silviculture methods. Trust fund management requires knowledge of BD,
KV and SSSS authorities. It is preferable that the candidate has or
may meet FSR and/or Contracting Officer qualifications.

Other Information of Interest:
The area of consideration is Government-wide.

One position will be advertised.

In addition to the duty station city, work will be performed at other
locations as needed.

The work schedule is maxiflex. Under a maxiflex schedule, a full-time
employee has a basic work requirement of 80 hours for the biweekly pay
period but may vary the number of hours worked on a given workday or
the number of hours each week within the limits established by the
Forest Service unit.

Overnight travel is required occasionally.

Transfer of station benefits for existing federal employees are
allowed per FSH 6509.33.

Additional Information:

For more information about the position, Forest or local communities contact:

Harv Skjerven
715 362-1342
jskjerven@fs.fed.us

If you are interested in being considered, please complete and submit
the attached “Outreach Notice Form” to: Harv Skjerven by July 12, 2012
via email: jskjerven@fs.fed.us. Outreaches may also be sent to Harv
at Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, 500 Hanson Lake Road,
Rhinelander, WI 54501 or by fax (715) 369-8859.

Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest is located in the beautiful
Upper Great Lakes Region of the Midwest and Wisconsin’s Northwoods,
covering over a million and a half acres. The Chequamegon side of the
forest covers about 858,400 acres in Ashland, Bayfield, Sawyer, Price,
Taylor, and Vilas counties while the Nicolet side covers nearly
661,400 acres in Florence, Forest, Langlade, Oconto, Oneida, and Vilas
counties.

Renowned for its four seasons of natural beauty, it is home to a
diverse array of northern hardwoods, pines, and meadows. It is
bountiful with lakes, rivers, and streams. Areas of highlands overlook
the surrounding landscapes.

The Wisconsin Northwoods have been the destination of recreationists
and vacationers for over a century, with its abundant opportunities
for fishing, biking, hunting, camping, hiking, skiing, boating,
birding, and cultural resource sights and attractions. Located 300-450
miles north of Chicago, the Northwoods weather is characterized by
generally pleasant summers of warm days and cool nights, perfect for
enjoying the abundant lakes, camping sites, canoeing and kayaking
rivers. The fall season is generally cool and dominated by great
panoramas of color. The winters generally offer plentiful snowfalls,
cold temperatures, and great opportunities to frequently snowshoe,
ski, and snowmobile.

Community Descriptions:

The city of Rhinelander was born in the boom days of logging. Settled
in 1880, it was first called Pelican Rapids. Today, Rhinelander is
home to approximately 8,000 people. As the county seat for Oneida
County, Rhinelander has a strong commercial and industrial base and
serves as the business and service center for Oneida County.

Oneida County is a year-round outdoor playground with 1,100 lakes
nestled among miles of winding trails. Visitors and residents can boat
or fish, hike or bike, snowmobile or cross-country ski, or just enjoy
solitude, spectacular fall colors, the silent forest in winter, and
verdant summers.

Oneida County’s historic courthouse, famous for its Tiffany glass
dome, also resides in Rhinelander, along with the scenic Nicolet
College campus.

The City offers several parks. Hodag Park is located along the
beautiful Boom Lake shoreline. Pioneer Park features a logging and
railroad museum complex. The city also owns and maintains an 18-hole
public golf course rated 5th in Wisconsin. The City is also home to
the Rhinelander District Library, named 2005 Library of the Year by
the Wisconsin Library Association.

The “Hodag Country Festival”, featuring top names in country
entertainment, is one of many activities, art and craft shows,
parades, and fishing tournaments visitors also enjoy.

Rhinelander offers the perfect balance between unspoiled nature and
city life. Get away from life’s daily hassles while still staying
connected with the busy outside world. Rhinelander is also home to
the Oneida County Airport, a regional airport that offers daily
connecting flights to Milwaukee and the Twin Cities.

OUTREACH NOTICE
APPLICANT REPLY FORM

If you are interested in this position, please complete and submit
this form to one of the persons identified above as contacts. This
will help us determine the level of interest of prospective candidates
and establish the area of consideration. Thanks for your cooperation.

Title of Outreach Position: Forestry Technician (Forest Timber Sale Adm)

Name:

Email Address:

Mailing Address:

Telephone Number: Work: Home:

Agency Employed with: 0 USFS 0 Other (Please list):

Type of appointment currently under (please check one):

0 Permanent 0 Temporary 0 Term 0 Other (Please list):

Current Region/Forest/District:

Current Series and Grade:

Current Position/Title:

If not a current permanent (career or career conditional) employee,
are you eligible to be hired under any of the following special
authorities:

0 Persons with Disabilities
0 Veterans Recruitment Appointment
0 Disabled Veteran w/30% Compensable Disability
0 Veteran Employment Opportunities Act of 1998
0 Former Peace Corp Volunteer
0 Student Career Experience Program
0 Other (explain):

THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR VACANCY

Updated: Fire Engine Operator Job Opening, Plumas National Forest

PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST

_______________________________
OUTREACH NOTICE
PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST
Mt. Hough Ranger District
Quincy, CA
___________________________________

The Plumas National Forest, Mt. Hough Ranger District has the
following vacancy currently open:

Supervisory Forestry Technician (Fire Engine Operator), GS-0462-08
The Mt. Hough ranger District will be filling a temporary detail (120
days) beginning in July 2012. Per Diem will not be available

Description of the duties associated with this position:
Responsible for the day-to-day operation of the fire engine module,
prepares schedules and work plans, and sets work priorities.
Supervises operation of fire engine module in responding to wildland
fires. Directs the engine to fire locations and positions engine in
appropriate locations in consideration of safety of crew and
equipment. Evaluates onsite conditions, makes tactical decisions, and
determines appropriate responses. Makes initial size up of fire
situations, determines suppression method to use including hose lays,
deployment of crew, point of initial attack, type of tools to use, and
application of water, and hand line location and standards. Keeps
dispatcher or superior informed and requests additional assistance as
necessary. Maintains records and prepares reports on crew hours and
movement and history of action taken on fires. Determines probable
causes of fire and preserves evidence of human-caused fires.

Serves as initial attack Incident Commander on wildland fires, and
wildland urban interface/intermix situations occurring on the unit.
Identifies and analyzes tactics and strategies employed on these
incidents, and revises and/or develops approaches in view of specific
incident conditions. May be assigned regardless of geographic location
to other fireline supervisory positions such as Operations Section
Chief, Division/Group Supervisor, Strike Team/Task Force Leader or as
qualified.

KEY REQUIREMENTS:

Practical knowledge of the practices, methods, and techniques of
forestry and fire management sufficient to deal with all hazard
incidents (e.g., wildland fire, automobile accidents, hazardous
materials incidents, search and rescue, and catastrophic natural
events) in a complex wildland urban interface/intermix environment.

Thorough knowledge of fire engine hydraulic systems, foam and chemical
application systems, including effect of elevation, friction loss,
pressure, etc., pumping mechanisms, hose thread and apparatus
differences, and operating procedures to distribute hose lays and to
operate equipment for peak utilization.

Knowledge of fire behavior, fire organizations (i.e. Incident Command
System), fire equipment, fire line construction to suppress and direct
suppression of fires, and an understanding of the standard operating
procedures of structural fire departments, law enforcement, and other
all hazard responders sufficient to collaborate and coordinate on
incidents.

Knowledge of supervisory methods and personnel practices and
procedures to carry out responsibilities and to plan work schedules to
meet unit needs.

For more information contact:
Randy Jennings, DIV-2 Mt.Hough Ranger District
530-283-7630 or rcjennings@fs.fed.us

Area description:

The Plumas National Forest encompasses over a million acres of
tree-covered mountains, filled with hundreds of high alpine lakes and
thousands of miles of clear running streams. Elevations range from
3,000 to 8,000 feet. The area has four seasons with warm to hot days
and warm to cool nights in the summer, and periodic snowstorms in the
winter. Average annual precipitation is about 35~40 inches a year.
Within a half day or less drive are Lake Tahoe, Reno, Sacramento,
Susanville, San Francisco, Redding, Chico, California coast, Lake
Shasta, Lassen Volcanic National Park and a vast variety of activities
and opportunities. Popular activities within Plumas County and the
Plumas National Forest include hiking, fishing, hunting, camping,
boating, white water rafting, cross country skiing, snowmobiling, and
wildlife viewing.

Quincy, CA:

The community of Quincy is the Plumas County seat and has a population
of approximately 5,000. Quincy is located at an elevation of 3400 feet
in a small mountain valley in the northeastern Sierra Nevada. Area
vegetation is typically mixed conifer. Year-round county population is
approximately 25,000. Local community services include: a hospital, a
limited service airport, a public library, a theatre, a junior
college, a high school, two public elementary schools, one private
elementary school, a variety of churches, two supermarkets, a bowling
alley, a public pool, a health club, and numerous restaurants and
motels.

Greenville, CA:

Greenville is located in Indian Valley within Plumas County. With only
eight people per square mile and just one stoplight, Plumas County
offers a rural, four seasons, and mountain retreat type of setting.
Indian Valley, which includes the communities of Greenville,
Taylorsville, Crescent Mills and Canyon Dam, is rich in beauty and
history. Surrounded by a stunning mountain backdrop, the valley is
dotted with ranches, old barns and grazing cattle. The most alluring
aspect of this verdant meadow is its serenity. Greenville, the largest
of the communities within Indian Valley, offers a full range of
business and service establishments. It has a small rural hospital, an
elementary and high school. It is about 30 miles from Quincy, the
County Seat.

Blairsden/Graeagle/Portola, CA:

The community of Blairsden/Graeagle is located 60 miles west of Reno,
NV, and 20 miles east of Quincy at an elevation of approximately 4400
feet. Local community services include a market, hardware store,
bakery, deli, pizza parlor, one full service gas station, physician’s
clinic, dental office, post office, and several restaurants and
motels. There are four 18-hole championship and two 9-hole golf
courses within five miles of the office. Johnsville Ski Area is a
local historic downhill ski area which hosts two long board-racing
events per year as well as public downhill skiing. Rentals for a two
bedroom /two bath condominium start around $1000 per month and housing
costs for a three bedroom/two bath start around $180,000. Since
housing is expensive in the Blairsden/Graeagle area many employees
live in Portola or Quincy. The community of Portola (ten miles east of
Blairsden/Graeagle) has a population of 2,000 with services including
a hospital with physician’s clinic, a public library, one elementary
school, one middle school, one high school, a variety of churches, a
supermarket, a bowling alley, a health club, and several restaurants
and motels. Rentals for a two bedroom /one bath start around $600 per
month and housing costs for a three bedroom/two bath start around
$120,000.

The Blairsden/Graeagle, Portola, and Quincy communities offer a
variety of cultural events, and year-round sporting activities are
available for all ages in a picturesque mountain setting. The areas
have four seasons with warm days/cool nights in the summer and
periodic snowstorms in the winter. Average annual precipitation is 35
to 40 inches. Within an easy half day or less drive are Lake Tahoe,
Sacramento, Redding, Chico, Lake Shasta, Lassen Volcanic National
Park, and a vast variety of activities and opportunities.

Return the following interest form to Randy Jennings at
rcjennings@fs.fed.us with a copy of your resume or bio-sketch by June 29th

OUTREACH INTEREST FORM

Supervisory Forestry Technician (Fire Engine Operator), GS-0462-08
Plumas National Forest
Mt.Hough Ranger District

NAME: ______________________________________________________________________

E-MAIL ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________

MAILING ADDRESS: __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

TELEPHONE NUMBER: _______________________________________________________

AGENCY EMPLOYED WITH: ______USFS _____BLM ______OTHER__________

TYPE OF APPOINTMENT: ______PERMANENT _____ TEMPORARY ______ TERM

______ VRA
_____ PWD ______ OTHER

CURRENT REGION/FOREST/DISTRICT: _______________________________________________

CURRENT SERIES AND GRADE IF APPLICABLE:
____________________________________________________________________________________

CURRENT POSITION
TITLE:__________________________________________________________

WHERE DID YOU HEAR ABOUT VACANCY/OUTREACH? :
____________________________________________________________________________________

IF NOT A CURRENT PERMANENT (CAREER OR CAREER CONDITIONAL) EMPLOYEE
ARE YOU ELIGIBLE TO BE HIRED UNDER ANY OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIAL
AUTHORITIES:

______ PERSON WITH DISABILITIES
______ VETERANS READJUSTMENT
______ DISABLED VETERANS W/30% COMPENSABLE DISABILITY
______ VETERANS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ACT OF 1998
______ FORMER PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER
______ STUDENT CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM
______ OTHER
______________________________________________________________

Thank you for your interest in our Vacancy!

Fire Engine Operator Job Opening, Plumas National Forest

PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST

_______________________________
OUTREACH NOTICE
PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST
Mt. Hough Ranger District
Quincy, CA
___________________________________

The Plumas National Forest, Mt. Hough Ranger District has the
following vacancy currently open:

Forestry Technician (Fire Engine Operator), GS-0462-07

The Mt. Hough ranger District will be filling 2 temporary detail (120
days) beginning in July 2012. Per Diem will not be available

Description of the duties associated with this position:

Responsible for operation of fire engine module in responding to
wildland fires. Drives the engine to fire location and positions in
appropriate location in consideration of safety of crew and equipment.
Makes initial size up of fire situations, determines suppression
method to use, including hose lays, deployment of crew, point of
initial attack, type of tools to use, and application of water.
Carries out suppression action. Keeps dispatcher or SFEO informed and
requests additional assistance as necessary. Maintains records and
prepares reports on crew hours and movement and history of action
taken on fires. Determines probable causes of fire and preserves
evidence of human-caused fires. As acting SFEO 40% of the time, the
engine operator is responsible for day-to-day operation and
supervision of the module. Supervises the work of the crew, prepares
schedules and work plans, and sets priorities. Due to the nature of
the emergency fire suppression activities, and variability in
prescribed fire situations, there are frequent, abrupt, and unexpected
changes in work assignments, goals, and deadlines which require the
incumbent to constantly adjust operations under the stress of
continuously changing and extremely unpredictable conditions.
Identifies and analyzes tactics and strategies employed on these
incidents, and revises and/or develops approaches in view of specific
incident conditions. May be assigned regardless of geographic location
to other fireline supervisory positions such as Operations Section
Chief, Division/Group Supervisor, Strike Team/Task Force Leader as
qualified.
Implements a training program in compliance with applicable
requirements including, but not limited to Incident Command System
fire suppression principles and procedures. Develops and implements a
comprehensive physical training program to enhance the ability of
crewmembers to perform the required arduous firefighting duties.
Responsible for maintaining personnel incident related qualifications,
agency requirements, and local and state laws. Provides for crew
safety and welfare. In absence of SFEO, serves as initial attack
Incident Commander on wildland fires and wildland urban
interface/intermix situations occurring on the unit. Identifies and
analyzes tactics and strategies employed on these incidents and
revises and/or develops approaches in light of specific incident
conditions. Responsible for the day-to-day operation of the fire
engine module, prepares schedules and work plans, and sets work
priorities. Manages assigned property and may serve as Station Manager
by procuring, maintaining and inventoring tools and equipment to meet
individual crew needs, including handtools, chainsaws, firing
equipment, food and water provisions, and personal protective
equipment to ensure that assigned personnel meet fire readiness
standards on a daily basis. Insures the maintenance of crew fleet
equipment by coordinating repairs and scheduling maintenance with
approved maintenance facilities. Secures temporary replacement of
vehicles as needed. Fleet equipment may include crew carrying
vehicles, fire engines, pick ups, and stake side trucks. Maintains
vehicles to a specified degree of fire readiness and appearance.
Exercises procurement authority by executing blanket purchase
agreements, field purchase orders, GSA requisitions, and charge card
purchases

KEY REQUIREMENTS:

Practical knowledge of fire behavior, fire organizations (i.e.
Incident Command System), fire equipment, fire line construction to
suppress and direct suppression of fires, coordination of wildland
urban interface/intermix situations following Forest Service policy
and guidelines.

Knowledge of and ability to operate fire engine hydraulic systems,
foam and chemical application systems, including effect of elevation,
friction loss, pressure, etc., pumping mechanisms, hose thread and
apparatus differences, and operating procedures to lay hose and to
operate equipment for peak utilization.

Knowledge of safety practices in suppressing fires and various other
incidents to prevent injury, property damage or loss of life.
For more information contact:
Randy Jennings, DIV-2 Mt.Hough Ranger District
530-283-7630 or rcjennings@fs.fed.us

Area description:

The Plumas National Forest encompasses over a million acres of
tree-covered mountains, filled with hundreds of high alpine lakes and
thousands of miles of clear running streams. Elevations range from
3,000 to 8,000 feet. The area has four seasons with warm to hot days
and warm to cool nights in the summer, and periodic snowstorms in the
winter. Average annual precipitation is about 35~40 inches a year.
Within a half day or less drive are Lake Tahoe, Reno, Sacramento,
Susanville, San Francisco, Redding, Chico, California coast, Lake
Shasta, Lassen Volcanic National Park and a vast variety of activities
and opportunities. Popular activities within Plumas County and the
Plumas National Forest include hiking, fishing, hunting, camping,
boating, white water rafting, cross country skiing, snowmobiling, and
wildlife viewing.

Quincy, CA:

The community of Quincy is the Plumas County seat and has a population
of approximately 5,000. Quincy is located at an elevation of 3400 feet
in a small mountain valley in the northeastern Sierra Nevada. Area
vegetation is typically mixed conifer. Year-round county population is
approximately 25,000. Local community services include: a hospital, a
limited service airport, a public library, a theatre, a junior
college, a high school, two public elementary schools, one private
elementary school, a variety of churches, two supermarkets, a bowling
alley, a public pool, a health club, and numerous restaurants and
motels.

Greenville, CA:

Greenville is located in Indian Valley within Plumas County. With only
eight people per square mile and just one stoplight, Plumas County
offers a rural, four seasons, and mountain retreat type of setting.
Indian Valley, which includes the communities of Greenville,
Taylorsville, Crescent Mills and Canyon Dam, is rich in beauty and
history. Surrounded by a stunning mountain backdrop, the valley is
dotted with ranches, old barns and grazing cattle. The most alluring
aspect of this verdant meadow is its serenity. Greenville, the largest
of the communities within Indian Valley, offers a full range of
business and service establishments. It has a small rural hospital, an
elementary and high school. It is about 30 miles from Quincy, the
County Seat.

Blairsden/Graeagle/Portola, CA:

The community of Blairsden/Graeagle is located 60 miles west of Reno,
NV, and 20 miles east of Quincy at an elevation of approximately 4400
feet. Local community services include a market, hardware store,
bakery, deli, pizza parlor, one full service gas station, physician’s
clinic, dental office, post office, and several restaurants and
motels. There are four 18-hole championship and two 9-hole golf
courses within five miles of the office. Johnsville Ski Area is a
local historic downhill ski area which hosts two long board-racing
events per year as well as public downhill skiing. Rentals for a two
bedroom /two bath condominium start around $1000 per month and housing
costs for a three bedroom/two bath start around $180,000. Since
housing is expensive in the Blairsden/Graeagle area many employees
live in Portola or Quincy. The community of Portola (ten miles east of
Blairsden/Graeagle) has a population of 2,000 with services including
a hospital with physician’s clinic, a public library, one elementary
school, one middle school, one high school, a variety of churches, a
supermarket, a bowling alley, a health club, and several restaurants
and motels. Rentals for a two bedroom /one bath start around $600 per
month and housing costs for a three bedroom/two bath start around
$120,000.

The Blairsden/Graeagle, Portola, and Quincy communities offer a
variety of cultural events, and year-round sporting activities are
available for all ages in a picturesque mountain setting. The areas
have four seasons with warm days/cool nights in the summer and
periodic snowstorms in the winter. Average annual precipitation is 35
to 40 inches. Within an easy half day or less drive are Lake Tahoe,
Sacramento, Redding, Chico, Lake Shasta, Lassen Volcanic National
Park, and a vast variety of activities and opportunities.

Return the following interest form to Randy Jennings at
rcjennings@fs.fed.us with a copy of your resume or bio-sketch by June 29th

OUTREACH INTEREST FORM

Forestry Technician (Fire Engine Operator), GS-0462-07

Plumas National Forest
Mt.Hough Ranger District

NAME: ______________________________________________________________________

E-MAIL ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________

MAILING ADDRESS: __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

TELEPHONE NUMBER: _______________________________________________________

AGENCY EMPLOYED WITH: ______USFS _____BLM ______OTHER__________

TYPE OF APPOINTMENT: ______PERMANENT _____ TEMPORARY ______ TERM

______ VRA
_____ PWD ______ OTHER

CURRENT REGION/FOREST/DISTRICT: _______________________________________________

CURRENT SERIES AND GRADE IF APPLICABLE:
____________________________________________________________________________________

CURRENT POSITION
TITLE:__________________________________________________________

WHERE DID YOU HEAR ABOUT VACANCY/OUTREACH? :
____________________________________________________________________________________

IF NOT A CURRENT PERMANENT (CAREER OR CAREER CONDITIONAL) EMPLOYEE
ARE YOU ELIGIBLE TO BE HIRED UNDER ANY OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIAL
AUTHORITIES:

______ PERSON WITH DISABILITIES
______ VETERANS READJUSTMENT
______ DISABLED VETERANS W/30% COMPENSABLE DISABILITY
______ VETERANS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ACT OF 1998
______ FORMER PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER
______ STUDENT CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM
______ OTHER
______________________________________________________________

Thank you for your interest in our Vacancy!

Fire Handcrew Job Openings, Shawnee National Forest

(Handcrew)
Camel Rock
Garden-of-the-Gods

Introduction

The Shawnee National Forest will soon be filling several temporary
GS-0462-3/4/5, NTE 1039 hours Forestry Aid/Technician (Handcrew)
positions. These are arduous positions. The positions are located on
the Hidden Springs Ranger District with the actual duty location in
Murphysboro, Illinois. The work season runs from October through
April with a break in December. The nationwide vacancies are located
on the web at www.usajobs.opm.gov and are now open. The announcement
numbers are: OCRT-0462-3-FIRE-DT, OCRT-0462-4-HANDCREW-DT, and
OCRT-462-HANDCREW-DT-REL2. The primary purpose of these positions is
to perform wildland fire suppression/management/control as a
specialized firefighter with responsibility for the operation and
maintenance of specialized tools and equipment. Other wildland fire
related duties may involve fire prevention, patrol, detection, or
prescribed burning. The incumbents may be assigned into one or more
types of positions within the wildfire program where the individual’s
specialized skills are required. Come join our team and help make a
difference.

Duties

For GS-3 – Serves as a member of a fire crew assigned to suppress the
full range of wildland fires. Performs assignments as a wildland
firefighter in developing a working knowledge of fire suppression and
fuels management techniques, practices and terminology. This consists
of fireline construction, use of pumps and engines, hose lays using
appropriate nozzles and nozzle adjustments in the effective use of
water and additives, working in and around aircraft such as
helicopters, safety rules and basic fire behavior.

For GS-4 – Serves as a skilled crewmember on a hand crew assigned to
suppress a full range of difficult and complex wildland fires and
prescribed fires. Utilizes a variety of specialized tools, equipment,
and techniques while actively suppressing wildfires, such as a
pulaski, shovel, McLeod, ax and chainsaw to control the spread of
wildfire. Performs basic fireline activities such as line
construction, lopping and scattering of fuels using hand tools, along
with holding, patrolling, monitoring, and mop-up operations. Moves
dirt, chops brush, removes small trees, etc. to construct fire line.
Crewmember is responsible for observing the rules of wildland
firefighting safety and applying practices and techniques to minimize
resource damage.

For GS-5 – Serves as an experienced firefighter and work leader on a
hand crew or other related fire crews performing fire suppression
and/or fuels management duties under the most adverse conditions of
climate, fuels, and terrain. Performs the duties of a fully qualified
chain saw operator and chainsaw repair technician. Performs all
aspects of wildland and prescribed fire operations including
preparation, ignition, monitoring, holding, and mop up. Collects fire
weather data. Responsible for operation and maintenance of specialized
equipment used to respond to wildland and prescribed fire situations.
Participates in wildland fire and safety training in the techniques,
practices, and methods of fire suppression and in the safe, efficient
operation and use of tools, equipment, and vehicles used in fireline
activities, with emphasis on those used in the particular function
assigned.

Work Capacity Test (WCT) for wildland firefighters: This position
participates in wildland firefighting activities. Based on the type
of work performed. Taking and passing the WCT at the arduous level is
a “condition of employment.” The arduous fitness (Pack) Test consist
of a three (3) mile hike, within forty-five (45) minutes, while
carrying a forty-five (45) pound pack.

Description of Forest

At 280,000 acres, the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois is
the largest unit of public land in the state. The Supervisor’s Office
is located in Harrisburg, with Ranger Districts in Vienna and
Jonesboro. The Forest sits at the confluence of the Mississippi and
Ohio Rivers. The area is rich in history, reflecting the pioneer
movement of Americans into the west. The Forest is predominantly
oak-hickory, although pine was planted in many areas in the past. The
razorback ridges associated with the Ozark upthrust are found on the
west side of the Forest. The broader ridges associated with the
Shawnee hills are found on the east side of the Forest. The Wisconsin
glacier stopped north of the Shawnee, so the flat grand prairie (and
its corn fields) more associated with the state of Illinois starts 40
to 60 miles north of the Shawnee.

Additional information about the forest may be found at
www.fs.fed.us/r9/shawnee.

The Community

Murphysboro is located in Jackson County, population is around 12,000
residents. Murphysboro has a wide selection of restaurants, as well
as 2 grocery stores, a Wal-mart, and other amenities as needed. Some
rental housing is available in Murphysboro for short term leases. It
is located just west of the town of Carbondale where Southern Illinois
University is located; Carbondale also has a wide variety of stores
and restaurants, as well as rental properties available for short
terms.

Recreational and Cultural Opportunities

Recreational opportunities abound on the Shawnee. Hiking, hunting,
camping, biking, fishing (including several fishing tournaments) and
horseback riding are some of the recreational opportunities available.
The River-to-River Trail runs from the Mississippi River to the Ohio
River and crosses both the Forest and private properties. The Shawnee
contains a portion of the Ohio River National Scenic Byway. This
Byway is approximately 400 miles in length, runs from the
Ohio/Pennsylvania border to the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi
Rivers and crosses three national forests. There are seven
congressionally designated wildernesses on the Shawnee, which provide
both solitude and scenic beauty. There are a large number of
community festivals held in southern Illinois from the Apple Festival
in Murphysboro, to Festival Italiano in Herrin, to the Deer Festival
in Golconda, to Barbecue on the River in Paducah, KY. Golf courses
and tennis courts are available in many communities.

Climate

We experience all 4 seasons, with an average of 3” snow per year and
temperature rarely below 0 degrees. Summer days are sunny and humid
with highs in the 80’s – 90’s, occasionally topping 100. Spring
weather can occur in March and fall weather can extend into November.
During the spring and fall seasons, the climate and beauty of the area
is especially compeling. Spring brings an abundance of blooming
dogwoods, redbuds, and wildflowers. The fall is saturated with color,
as the leaves turn brilliant reds, golds, and yellows. Garden of the
Gods, the most visited site on the Forest, is a must-see during the
fall color season. The unusual rock formations, coupled with the
surrounding Garden of the Gods Wilderness, is Mother Nature at her
finest.

Education

Pre-schools through high schools can be found in most communities and
rank high in the state. There are several community colleges in the
area offering quite reasonable in-district tuition. Southern Illinois
University in Carbondale, IL offers a full range of baccalaureate
through doctorate programs. Day care facilities are also available in
most communities.

Churches

Churches representing all major denominations can be found in most communities.

Economy

Real estate here is moderately priced. The median price for
purchasing a home is approximately $85,000 and house rentals begin at
approximately $350 per month. Utilities are priced moderately.
Tourism is a developing economic force in the area. In recent years
several wineries have opened, offering two outstanding wine trails.
Southern Illinois offers a rural environment with easy access to all
possible amentities. Both shopping and entertainment opportunities are
abundant within the area. Marion, Carbondale, and Paducah offer
shopping malls, movie theaters, and several locally owned and operated
restaurants, along with major chain and fast-food restaurants.

Health Care

Health care facilities serving the area include full facility
Carbondale Doctor’s Memorial Hospital and Marion Memorial Hospital.
Services at these hospitals include cardiac units, oncology, and
neonatal units. Other hospitals providing care are Lourdes and
Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah. All the hospitals provide
24-hour emergency room physician coverage and specialists.

For further information about the duties, please contact Forest
Paukert, Supervisory Fire Engine Operator at 618-658-2111. For
information about the community, please contact Daryl Kirtley, Support
Services Specialist at 618-658-2111.

This outreach notice is to identify potential candidates to determine
the area of consideration. FOREST SERVICE EMPLOYEES ON THE WORKFORCE
REDUCTION AND PLACEMENT LIST WILL RECEIVE PRIORITY CONSIDERATION AND
CTAP/ICTAP ELIGIBLES WILL RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE CONSIDERATION. If
you are interested in applying for this position, please respond on
the enclosed Outreach Notice Form by July 6, 2012.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in
all of its programs and activities on the basis of race, color,
national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex (including
gender identity and expression), marital status, familial status,
parental status, religion, sexual orientation, political beliefs,
genetic information, reprisal, or because all or part of an
individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program.
(Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with
disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write to:
USDA
Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Stop 9410
Washington, DC 20250-9410

Or call toll-free at (866) 632-9992 (English) or (800) 877-8339 (TDD)
or (866) 377-8642 (English Federal-relay) or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish
Federal-relay). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

OUTREACH RESPONSE FORM

If you are interested in these positions, be sure to submit your
application through USAJobs when it is advertised. In addition, you
are encouraged to complete this form and reply to Monica Neal by
July 6, 2012 in one of three ways:

E-mail: monicaneal@fs.fed.us. Fax: (618) 253-1063
Mail: Monica Neal
Shawnee National Forest
50 Hwy 145 S
Harrisburg, IL 62946

For additional details on the position, you may call Forest Paukert at
(618) 658-2111

By completing this form, you are indicating that you are interested in
the following positions, please place an “X” in the position(s) you
are interested in:

• _____Forestry Aid – Fire, GS-0462-3 (OCRT-0462-3-FIRE-DT) 1039
seasonal position
• _____Forestry Technician – Handcrew, GS-0462-4
(OCRT-0462-4-HANDCREW-DT) 1039 seasonal position
• _____Forestry Technician – Handcrew, GS-0462-5
(OCRT-0462-4-HANDCREW-DT-REL2) 1039 seasonal position

Location:
• Region 9, Shawnee National Forest, Murphysboro Work Center in
Murphysboro, Illinois.

PERSONAL INFORMATION:
Name Date
Address
City State
Zip E-Mail
Phone number(s)
Are you currently a federal employee
If Yes, current agency and location
current title/series/grade
Type of Appointment if Current Government Employee Permanent Term Temporary
Type of Schedule if Government Employee Full-time Part-time Intermittent
If you are not a current permanent (career or career conditional)
employee, are you eligible for appointment under any of the following
special authorities (check the appropriate box):
Person with Disabilities
Veteran Readjustment
Former Peace Corps Volunteer
Disabled Veteran with 30% Compensable Disability
Student Career Experience Program
Veterans Employment Opportunities Act 0f 1998
Other, please describe:

Fire Engine Operator Job Opening, Shawnee National Forest

(Fire Engine Operator)
Camel Rock
Garden-of-the-Gods

Introduction

The Shawnee National Forest will soon be filling several temporary
GS-0462-3/4, NTE 1039 hours Forestry Aid/Technician (Fire Engine
Operator) positions. These are arduous positions. The positions are
located on the Hidden Springs Ranger District with the actual duty
location in Vienna, Illinois or Murphysboro, Illinois. The work
season runs from October through April with a break in December. The
nationwide vacancies are located on the web at www.usajobs.opm.gov and
are now open. The announcement numbers are: OCRT-0462-3-FIRE-DT and
OCRT-0462-4-ENGINE-DT. The primary purpose of these positions is to
perform wildland fire suppression/management/control as a specialized
firefighter with responsibility for the operation and maintenance of
specialized tools and equipment. Other wildland fire related duties
may involve fire prevention, patrol, detection, or prescribed burning.
The incumbents may be assigned into one or more types of positions
within the wildfire program where the individual’s specialized skills
are required. Come join our team and help make a difference.

Duties

For GS-3 – Serves as a member of a fire crew assigned to suppress the
full range of wildland fires. Performs assignments as a wildland
firefighter in developing a working knowledge of fire suppression and
fuels management techniques, practices and terminology. This consists
of fireline construction, use of pumps and engines, hose lays using
appropriate nozzles and nozzle adjustments in the effective use of
water and additives, working in and around aircraft such as
helicopters, safety rules and basic fire behavior.

For GS-4 – Serves as a skilled crewmember on an engine. As an
assistant on a wildland fire engine, works as a trainee engine
operator driving the engine, operating the pump and making hose lays
under the direction of the engine foreman. Responsible for
positioning the fire engine or apparatus for safe and efficient
operation.

Work Capacity Test (WCT) for wildland firefighters: This position
participates in wildland firefighting activities. Based on the type
of work performed. Taking and passing the WCT at the arduous level is
a “condition of employment.” The arduous fitness (Pack) Test consist
of a three (3) mile hike, within forty-five (45) minutes, while
carrying a forty-five (45) pound pack.

Description of Forest

At 280,000 acres, the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois is
the largest unit of public land in the state. The Supervisor’s Office
is located in Harrisburg, with Ranger Districts in Vienna and
Jonesboro, and a work-center in Murphysboro. The Forest sits at the
confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. The area is rich in
history, reflecting the pioneer movement of Americans into the west.
The Forest is predominantly oak-hickory, although pine was planted in
many areas in the past. The razorback ridges associated with the
Ozark upthrust are found on the west side of the Forest. The broader
ridges associated with the Shawnee hills are found on the east side of
the Forest. The Wisconsin glacier stopped north of the Shawnee, so
the flat grand prairie (and its corn fields) more associated with the
state of Illinois starts 40 to 60 miles north of the Shawnee.

Additional information about the forest may be found at
www.fs.fed.us/r9/shawnee.

The Community

The city of Vienna is located off I-24. It is the county seat for
Johnson County and has a population of about 1,500. Vienna is mostly
an agricultural community. However, one minimum security and one
medium security correctional center employ approximately 800 people
combined. Vienna has many stores and services, and if what you need
is not here, then it is likely to be found in the surrounding area.
There are two dentists in town. There are four hospitals located in a
35 miles radius. There is a health clinic, optometrist, chiropractor,
and pharmacy all located in Vienna. There are two banks and one
credit union. There is a grocery store, dry cleaners, two auto
dealerships, two auto supply stores, a furniture store, a hardware
store, and many other services. There are several restaurants and
civic organizations throughout Johnson County. There are several
churches located here. There is a weekly newspaper and a library.
There are several elementary schools, a middle school, and high
school. There are several community colleges and universities in the
surrounding area.
The local park offers shelters for picnics and group gathering,
volleyball, a basketball court, fitness area, walking trail, a
playground and lots of room for several lawn sports. The high school
tennis courts are available to the public. A PGA-certified 18 hole
golf course is on the outskirt of town. Nearby full service
communities are Marion, IL approximately 25 miles North, Carbondale,
IL approximately 40 miles Northwest and Paducah, KY approximately 35
Southeast. Small commercial airports are available in those
communities with international airports located in St. Louis, MO (130
miles Northwest) and Nashville, TN (165 miles Southeast).

Murphysboro is located in Jackson County, population is around 12,000
residents. Murphysboro has a wide selection of restaurants, as well
as 2 grocery stores, a Wal-mart, and other amenities as needed. Some
rental housing is available in Murphysboro for short term leases. It
is located just west of the town of Carbondale where Southern Illinois
University is located; Carbondale also has a wide variety of stores
and restaurants, as well as rental properties available for short
terms.

Recreational and Cultural Opportunities

Recreational opportunities abound on the Shawnee. Hiking, hunting,
camping, biking, fishing (including several fishing tournaments) and
horseback riding are some of the recreational opportunities available.
The River-to-River Trail runs from the Mississippi River to the Ohio
River and crosses both the Forest and private properties. The Shawnee
contains a portion of the Ohio River National Scenic Byway. This
Byway is approximately 400 miles in length, runs from the
Ohio/Pennsylvania border to the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi
Rivers and crosses three national forests. There are seven
congressionally designated wildernesses on the Shawnee, which provide
both solitude and scenic beauty. There are a large number of
community festivals held in southern Illinois from the Apple Festival
in Murphysboro, to Festival Italiano in Herrin, to the Deer Festival
in Golconda, to Barbecue on the River in Paducah, KY. Golf courses
and tennis courts are available in many communities.

Climate

We experience all 4 seasons, with an average of 3” snow per year and
temperature rarely below 0 degrees. Summer days are sunny and humid
with highs in the 80’s – 90’s, occasionally topping 100. Spring
weather can occur in March and fall weather can extend into November.
During the spring and fall seasons, the climate and beauty of the area
is especially compeling. Spring brings an abundance of blooming
dogwoods, redbuds, and wildflowers. The fall is saturated with color,
as the leaves turn brilliant reds, golds, and yellows. Garden of the
Gods, the most visited site on the Forest, is a must-see during the
fall color season. The unusual rock formations, coupled with the
surrounding Garden of the Gods Wilderness, is Mother Nature at her
finest.

Education

Pre-schools through high schools can be found in most communities and
rank high in the state. There are several community colleges in the
area offering quite reasonable in-district tuition. Southern Illinois
University in Carbondale, IL offers a full range of baccalaureate
through doctorate programs. Day care facilities are also available in
most communities.

Churches

Churches representing all major denominations can be found in most communities.

Economy

Real estate here is moderately priced. The median price for
purchasing a home is approximately $85,000 and house rentals begin at
approximately $350 per month. Utilities are priced moderately.
Tourism is a developing economic force in the area. In recent years
several wineries have opened, offering two outstanding wine trails.
Southern Illinois offers a rural environment with easy access to all
possible amentities. Both shopping and entertainment opportunities are
abundant within the area. Marion, Carbondale, and Paducah offer
shopping malls, movie theaters, and several locally owned and operated
restaurants, along with major chain and fast-food restaurants.

Health Care

Health care facilities serving the area include full facility
Carbondale Doctor’s Memorial Hospital and Marion Memorial Hospital.
Services at these hospitals include cardiac units, oncology, and
neonatal units. Other hospitals providing care are Lourdes and
Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah. All the hospitals provide
24-hour emergency room physician coverage and specialists.

For further information about the duties, please contact Forest
Paukert, Supervisory Fire Engine Operator at 618-658-2111. For
information about the community, please contact Daryl Kirtley, Support
Services Specialist at 618-658-2111.

This outreach notice is to identify potential candidates to determine
the area of consideration. FOREST SERVICE EMPLOYEES ON THE WORKFORCE
REDUCTION AND PLACEMENT LIST WILL RECEIVE PRIORITY CONSIDERATION AND
CTAP/ICTAP ELIGIBLES WILL RECEIVE THE APPROPRIATE CONSIDERATION. If
you are interested in applying for this position, please respond on
the enclosed Outreach Notice Form by July 6, 2012.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in
all of its programs and activities on the basis of race, color,
national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex (including
gender identity and expression), marital status, familial status,
parental status, religion, sexual orientation, political beliefs,
genetic information, reprisal, or because all or part of an
individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program.
(Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with
disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write to:
USDA
Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Stop 9410
Washington, DC 20250-9410

Or call toll-free at (866) 632-9992 (English) or (800) 877-8339 (TDD)
or (866) 377-8642 (English Federal-relay) or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish
Federal-relay). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

OUTREACH RESPONSE FORM

If you are interested in these positions, be sure to submit your
application through USAJobs when it is advertised. In addition, you
are encouraged to complete this form and reply to Monica Neal by
July 6, 2012 in one of three ways:

E-mail: monicaneal@fs.fed.us. Fax: (618) 253-1063
Mail: Monica Neal
Shawnee National Forest
50 Hwy 145 S
Harrisburg, IL 62946

For additional details on the position, you may call Forest Paukert at
(618) 658-2111

By completing this form, you are indicating that you are interested in
the following positions, please place an “X” in the position(s) you
are interested in:

• _____Forestry Aid – Fire, GS-0462-3 (OCRT-0462-3-FIRE-DT) 1039
seasonal position
• _____Forestry Technician – Engine, GS-0462-4 (OCRT-0462-4-ENGINE-DT)
1039 seasonal position

Location:
• Region 9, Shawnee National Forest, 3 position will be filled at the
Ranger Station in Vienna, Illinois and 3 positions will be filled at
the Murphysboro Work Center in Murphysboro, Illinois.

PERSONAL INFORMATION:
Name Date
Address
City State
Zip E-Mail
Phone number(s)
Are you currently a federal employee
If Yes, current agency and location
current title/series/grade
Type of Appointment if Current Government Employee Permanent Term Temporary
Type of Schedule if Government Employee Full-time Part-time Intermittent
If you are not a current permanent (career or career conditional)
employee, are you eligible for appointment under any of the following
special authorities (check the appropriate box):
Person with Disabilities
Veteran Readjustment
Former Peace Corps Volunteer
Disabled Veteran with 30% Compensable Disability
Student Career Experience Program
Veterans Employment Opportunities Act 0f 1998
Other, please describe:

Communications Coordinator Job Opening, USFS Region 9/Eastern Region

Outreach Notice
Communications Coordinator
Region 9, Eastern Region, Milwaukee, WI

Position
The Eastern Region is looking for the right person in a GS-1035-09/11
Communications Coordinator position in the Public and Government
Relations Staff. Primary duties include organizing and coordinating
media interviews, summarizing regional news items, and developing
communications plans. This is an exceptional opportunity to work with
other talented and creative employees involved in social media,
traditional media, visual design, marketing, legislative affairs, and
the nationally renowned Urban Connections Program. Work across a
diverse region of 20 states including 14 forests and a national
tallgrass prairie. This geographically and socially diverse
landscape, creates the perfect mix of opportunities for professionals
who want to inspire a larger land ethic through powerful and effective
communication.

Location
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Duties

1. Communicates program initiatives/activities. Employs a variety of
techniques to analyze the effectiveness of products, orientations, and
briefings. Advises managers and staff on the best methods to employ
in communicating information. Coordinates across multiple offices to
independently prepare and respond to various requests for information.

2. Responds to requests for information requiring coordination with a
variety of USDA Forest Service offices. Determines the nature of the
data required and independently prepares material (i.e. news releases,
fact sheets, brochures, booklets, broadcast spots, etc.) based upon
the nature of the request.

3. Participates in planning and implementing an external communication
program to disseminate information about agency activities and their
effects on stakeholders.

4. Writing and analysis. Researches, writes and edits informational
material. Develops complete articles for release to the news media.
Prepares short speeches or sections of speeches and talking points
covering various topics.

Other Information of Interest

➢ The area of consideration is Government wide and External DEMO.
➢ One position will be advertised.
➢ The work schedule is maxiflex; occasional weekend or overtime work
may be required.
➢ Travel including overnight stays is required periodically.
➢ Transfer of station benefits for existing federal employees are
allowed per FSH 6509.33
➢ Transfer of station benefits are not provided under the DEMO announcement.

Outreach Response
For more information please Jane Cliff at (414) 297 3664 or jcliff@fs.fed.us.

Milwaukee: A Great Place on a Great Lake!”

Milwaukee is a small version of Chicago, a mid-western city where the
people are friendly and the weather is… well it’s not Hawaii, but
then, you didn’t think it would be, did you?

The Milwaukee area has solid schools, many performing arts
opportunities, major league sports, good public transportation, and a
location on Lake Michigan, the second largest of the five Great Lakes,
by volume.

Metro Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s largest population center, is located on
Lake Michigan’s western shore, 90 miles north of Chicago. Metro
Milwaukee encompasses four counties and has a combined population of
more than 1.4 million people. It ranks as the nation’s 36th largest
metropolitan area. The city of Milwaukee ranks as the nation’s 17th
largest city with a population of 620,609.

The Milwaukee area offers a high quality of life for many reasons.
It’s big enough to offer urban amenities, yet it also offers a
small-town feeling in many well-established and proud neighborhoods.
It’s home to a diverse community of people. Milwaukee is serviced by
a community based public school system, numerous hospitals and health
care facilities and churches.

Milwaukee offers four seasons with average temperatures ranging from
∼ 12-39°F during winter,
∼ 36-75°F during spring,
∼ 54-81°F during summer, and
∼ 18-59°F during fall.

Average annual precipitation is 31 inches and average annual snowfall
is 47 inches. While it may snow frequently, it doesn’t stay on the
ground long enough for serious cross-country skiing. The growing
season for gardens is generally from May 15 to September 15.
Midsummer can have hot and humid stretches, but most people can live
without air conditioning. Spring and fall are simply glorious.

The city’s natural beauty includes a 14,759 acre county park system
and a setting on the shore of Lake Michigan. You’re never too far
from the countryside here. Milwaukee is on the doorstep of many
Wisconsin inland lakes, streams, farms, and forests where skiing,
hiking, swimming, hunting, and fishing can keep you active year-round.
Sailing, charter boating, biking, indoor and outdoor ice skating, and
golfing are among the many other recreation opportunities available.

Milwaukee is an urban center, yet travel is fairly un-congested.
Public transportation is offered through the County of Milwaukee bus
system. General Mitchell International Airport is also located in
Milwaukee.

Milwaukee is nationally recognized as the “City of Festivals” and for
the “Great Circus Parade.” Festivals start in June with Summerfest
and continue through the summer as different ethnic groups host
weekend festivities at the lakefront. Milwaukee has a renowned public
museum system, excellent library facilities, numerous radio and TV
stations, a major daily newspaper, botanical gardens, and a zoo. For
the art enthusiast, the city boasts a world-class symphony orchestra,
repertory theater, opera and ballet companies, and an outstanding art
museum. For the sports fan, this is a major league sports center.
It’s the home of baseball’s Milwaukee Brewers, basketball’s Milwaukee
Bucks, hockey’s Milwaukee Admirals and soccer’s Milwaukee Wave.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Marquette University offer
outstanding post-secondary education opportunities. In addition,
there are also 10 colleges, two technical schools, and numerous
specialty schools to choose from.

For more information on Milwaukee visit: www.ci.mil.wi.us, or
www.jsonline.com. For more information on Wisconsin visit:
www.wisconsin.gov.

Reply by: 07/06/ 2012 USDA FOREST SERVICE
EASTERN REGION – REGIONAL OFFICE
OUTREACH RESPONSE FORM
To complete form, use tab key to move between fields (gray blocks), or
left click on any field. Entries in check box fields are made by a
single click to select or unselect. Type entries in other fields.
Position Identification

Position Title: Communications Coordinator, Eastern Region (R9)
Location: Milwaukee, WI

Applicant Information
Name: E-Mail Address:
Current Title, Series, Grade
Current Organization/Location:
Current Appointment: 0 Permanent 0 Temporary 0 Term 0 Not Current Employee
If you are NOT a current permanent (career or career conditional)
employee, are you eligible to be hired under any of the following
authorities:
0 Reinstatement
0 Disabled Veteran with 30% Compensable Disability
0 Veteran’s Employment Opportunities Act of 1998
0 Other
0 Person With Disabilities
0 Former Peace Corps Volunteer
0 Demonstration Project (external
recruitment from the general public)

Position Interest
I would like to be considered for this position in the series identified.
0
Series currently identified and classified
0
Other appropriate series for which I am qualified
I would like to be considered for this position at the grade level identified.
0
Target grade level currently identified.
0
Other grade level for which I am qualified (below target grade)
I would like to be considered for this position at the location identified
0 Milwaukee, WI

I am interested in the following position(s)
0 Communications Coordinator, Eastern
Region, GS-1035-09/11

Applicants May Use This Space to Identify Special Qualifications,
Interests, Needs or Provide Other Information:

How did you hear about this vacancy (i.e. outreach database, email,
web, friends, etc.)

Interested applicants or those desiring further information may send
this completed form via email to jcliff@fs.fed.us or FAX to
414-944-3966 by COB July 06, 2012. SUBMISSION OF THIS FORM IS
VOLUNTARY.

Lands and Minerals Specialist Job Opening at Kaibab National Forest

Permanent Full Time
Zone Lands & Minerals Specialist
GS-0401-11
Kaibab National Forest
Duty Station: Williams, AZ

IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITY… and working with a
dynamic group of people, the Kaibab National Forest in north-central
Arizona will soon be filling a Lands and Minerals Specialist on the
South Zone of the Forest. Duty station will be located in Williams, AZ
and the position is supervised by the Williams District Ranger.

The Lands and Minerals Specialist for the South Zone (Williams and
Tusayan Ranger Districts) has the responsibility for providing
leadership, coordination, developing budgets, facilitation and
coaching for the zone lands and minerals program. Maintaining and
improving relationships with sandstone quarry operators and mining
claimants, communication site lease holders, local, state and county
governments and private land owners are key elements for this
position. You will also supervise a GS-9 Geologist/Lands and Minerals
Assistant.

Our lands and mineral program most recently has had challenges with
exploratory drilling for uranium, land exchange parcels and expired
special use permits. The Districts have implemented travel management
restrictions and challenges with private landowners wanting access via
closed roads have also been a priority for this position.

This is an exciting time to be on the Kaibab as we are one of the four
Northern Arizona National Forests involved with a national initiative
known as the 4 Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI). This project is a
collaborative effort, with many stakeholders, that is looking at
treating 2.4 million acres across the four forests and restoring fire
in our fire adapted ecosystems. The first project area will occur on
the South Zone of the Kaibab as well as a portion of the Coconino
National Forest. This position will be involved in determining access
needs and easement determinations for implementation of the project.

KAIBAB NATIONAL FOREST… is one of the six National Forests in Arizona,
covers roughly 1.6 million acres, and is located immediately adjacent
to both the north and south rims of Grand Canyon National Park. The
Forest is composed of three Ranger Districts, and is headquartered in
Williams, Arizona. We have approximately 140 permanent and 80
temporary employees.

On the south end of the forest, the Williams Ranger District is
adjacent to the Coconino and Prescott National Forests, and to the
Navajo Army Depot (Arizona National Guard). Square in the middle,
Tusayan Ranger District is bordered by the Havasupai Reservation to
the west, Grand Canyon National Park immediately north, and the Navajo
Reservation to the east. Just north of the forest boundary on the
North Kaibab Ranger District, Bureau of Land Management public lands
are managed by the Arizona Strip Field Office.

Major resource programs on the Forest include fire and fuel
management, recreation, range, timber and other vegetation management,
wildlife and common variety mineral (sandstone) production. The Grand
Canyon Game Preserve on the Kaibab Plateau was created by President
Teddy Roosevelt in 1906, and still has a key focus in the management
of the Kaibab deer herd. There are four Wilderness areas, and the
Arizona Trail passes through two ranger districts as it crosses the
state.

Elevations on the Forest range from about 5,000 feet to over 10,000
feet. Vegetation varies from near desert-like conditions at the lower
canyon elevations to pinyon-juniper woodlands, to the ponderosa pine
belt, and up to the mixed conifer forests of pine, spruce and aspen in
the cooler upper elevations. Wildlife is abundant, with elk, mule
deer, antelope, turkey, and coyote being the most common larger
species.

The Forest lies in a relatively mild climate zone, with summer
temperatures averaging from lows of 50°F at night to highs of 85°F
during the day. Winter temperatures average from 20°F to 45°F, with
snow being common but generally not staying long. The cool and rainy
monsoon season in July and August brings relief from the summer heat
via brief and sometimes violent thunderstorms across the Forest.
Annual precipitation in the Williams area averages about 22 inches,
with an average total snowfall of 70 inches.

The south end of the forest lies within a 3-hour drive of the
metropolitan Phoenix area (current population 3.5 million), and all of
the 4-5 million annual visitors to Grand Canyon National Park pass
through the forest enroute to that destination. Almost all of the
forest lies within Coconino County, the third-largest county in the
United States, with the county seat located in Flagstaff, AZ.

For more information on the Kaibab National Forest, please visit our
website at www.fs.fed.us/r3/kai

Williams Ranger District is the southern district on the forest, and
is about 600,000 acres in size. Located just above the Mogollon Rim,
the District is a mix of ponderosa pine forest, pinyon-juniper
woodlands, and grasslands. Nearly all resource programs and management
activities are shared in a zone with the Tusayan Ranger District, with
both District Rangers splitting supervision of zone staff and sharing
responsibility for coordinating and directing management of the zone.
Approximately 50 permanent employees are stationed at the district,
with an additional 40 temporary employees added during the field
season.

The Williams Ranger District offers a variety of trails for hiking,
horseback riding, mountain biking and in the winter, cross-country
skiing and snowshoeing. A small, family-oriented downhill ski area
operates under special use permit on Bill Williams Mountain. Seven
lakes and four developed campgrounds are located on the district, and
there are a great many areas suitable for dispersed camping. Other
popular outdoor activities include hunting, fishing, wildlife viewing.

Tusayan Ranger District… is immediately adjacent to the south rim of
Grand Canyon National Park. The District covers approximately 300,000
acres and vegetation types vary from sagebrush-grasslands and
pinyon-juniper forests in the lower elevations to ponderosa pine
stands in the higher country. The Kaibab began managing wildland
fires to meet resource objectives in 2003 with Tusayan Ranger District
providing the bulk of opportunities. The primary objective of our
work is healthy forest restoration. The District also has active and
challenging minerals and range programs with approximately 2400 mining
claims and 3 large allotments. Other government agencies in the
immediate area include the National Park Service, and the Navajo,
Hopi, Hualapai and Havasupai Tribes.

Recreation opportunities include the various scenic and hiking trails
at the Grand Canyon, as well as many hunting opportunities for both
small and large game such as deer, trophy elk, turkey, squirrel and
many others. Fishing opportunities in the immediate area of Flagstaff
and Williams are provided by small lakes stocked annually with trout
and some other species. However, within a 2 – 4 hour drive of the
District you can find trophy trout fishing, bass fishing and all fresh
water species at Lake Powell, Roosevelt Lake, and other lakes in the
Phoenix area. Other recreational activities include mountain biking,
downhill and cross-country skiing, camping, wildlife viewing, hiking
and backpacking. Winters can be cold and snowy in northern Arizona,
providing opportunities for winter sports.

COMMUNITY INFORMATION…The City of Williams was founded in 1882 and
named for mountain man Bill Williams, who explored, trapped and guided
hunting parties through the area in the early 1800’s. Located 30
miles west of Flagstaff on Interstate 40, Williams is a full service
community with a population of about 3,300 people. The community lies
in the valleys and meadows at the base of Bill Williams Mountain,
surrounded by the Kaibab National Forest. The City of Williams bills
itself as “Gateway to the Grand Canyon.” The climate is mild, but
offers four (or more) distinct seasons. At an elevation of 6770 feet,
up above the Mogollon Rim, Williams escapes the brutal summer heat
more commonly associated with the Arizona desert to the south, and is
a popular weekend and vacation destination for many Arizona desert
residents (as well as those from many other states and countries)
during the summer months.

Because Historic Route 66 runs through town, and the Grand Canyon
Railway runs daily passenger excursion trips from Williams to the
Grand Canyon for visitors, there are numerous restaurants, motels and
hotels, bed and breakfast establishments, gift shops and gas stations.
During the summer months, there are all kinds of activities and
special events happening in Williams, including parades, a mountain
man rendezvous, shooting events, motorcycle rally, rodeos, and antique
car shows. The Kaibab National Forest partners with the City of
Williams, Grand Canyon and the Williams-Grand Canyon Chamber of
Commerce to operate the Williams-Kaibab National Forest Visitor Center
inside the restored Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Station in
downtown Williams, and served more than 80,000 visitors during 2011.

Williams has many churches, schools are k-12, and Coconino Community
College has a satellite campus here. There is a medical clinic,
complete with ambulance service, and a dental clinic. A regional
medical center/hospital and other medical facilities are located about
½ hour away in Flagstaff. There is an 18-hole golf course, small
parks and rodeo grounds in town. For large city shopping and other
amenities, Phoenix is about 200 miles and 3 hours away via interstate
freeway. Active community service clubs include Rotary International,
Kiwanis and Lions, and there are many local volunteer organizations
serving a wide variety of community needs.

Costs for and quality of single-family houses in and around Williams
vary widely, but a reasonable range would be $200-300,000 for newer
3BR homes. Rental housing is scarce. Housing and other development
in Northern Arizona is generally limited by lack of available water
and limited private land. Government housing is not available.

For more information on Williams visit the Williams Grand Canyon
Chamber of Commerce http://www.williamschamber.com

CONTACTS… For additional information about this opportunity, please
call Williams District Ranger Martie Schramm at (928) 635-5630 or
Tusayan District Ranger Nick Larson at (928) 635-8230

.

Supervisory Forestry Technician Job Opening, Plumas National Forest

PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST

_______________________________
OUTREACH NOTICE
PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST
Mt.Hough Ranger District
Quincy, CA
___________________________________

The Plumas National Forest, Mt.Hough Ranger District has the following
vacancy currently open:

Supervisory Forestry Technician (ADFMO), GS-0462-09

The Mt. Hough Ranger District will be filling a temporary detail (120
days) beginning in July 2012. Per diem will not be available.

Description of the duties associated with this position:

Directs safe initial attack and extended attack suppression actions,
including determining incident needs, dispatch, and deployment of
personnel and equipment. Determines and implements fire management
tactics appropriate to the area involved. Serves as acting DFMO on a
regular basis throughout the year.
Coordinates and directs the District’s fire prevention detection, and
suppression operations consistent with the fire management policy and
program in achievement of the overall District program of work.
Assists the DFMO in managing other District programs, such as, fleet
equipment, budget allocations and cooperator agreements.
Supervises a group of employees performing work at the GS-08 level.
Provides administrative and technical supervision necessary for
accomplishing the work of the unit.

KEY REQUIREMENTS:
Knowledge of fire behavior, fire hazard and risk analysis, fuel volume
and flammability assessment, and firefighting techniques sufficient to
prepare independently complex fire suppression plans, fuels management
plans, and programs for a diverse forest area.
Ability to effectively communicate to prepare plans and reports, to
deal with the public and cooperators
Knowledge of management methods pertaining to work planning,
scheduling, budgeting, and directing the accomplishment of program
elements
Thorough knowledge of supervisory methods and of personnel policies,
regulations and procedures, to effectively supervise employees.
Practical knowledge of fire gained from wildland fireline firefighting
experience and/or participation in prescribed burn field operations is
required.
For more information contact:
Randy Jennings, DIV-2 Mt.Hough Ranger District
530-283-7630 or rcjennings@fs.fed.us

Area description:

The Plumas National Forest encompasses over a million acres of
tree-covered mountains, filled with hundreds of high alpine lakes and
thousands of miles of clear running streams. Elevations range from
3,000 to 8,000 feet. The area has four seasons with warm to hot days
and warm to cool nights in the summer, and periodic snowstorms in the
winter. Average annual precipitation is about 35~40 inches a year.
Within a half day or less drive are Lake Tahoe, Reno, Sacramento,
Susanville, San Francisco, Redding, Chico, California coast, Lake
Shasta, Lassen Volcanic National Park and a vast variety of activities
and opportunities. Popular activities within Plumas County and the
Plumas National Forest include hiking, fishing, hunting, camping,
boating, white water rafting, cross country skiing, snowmobiling, and
wildlife viewing.

Quincy, CA:

The community of Quincy is the Plumas County seat and has a population
of approximately 5,000. Quincy is located at an elevation of 3400 feet
in a small mountain valley in the northeastern Sierra Nevada. Area
vegetation is typically mixed conifer. Year-round county population is
approximately 25,000. Local community services include: a hospital, a
limited service airport, a public library, a theatre, a junior
college, a high school, two public elementary schools, one private
elementary school, a variety of churches, two supermarkets, a bowling
alley, a public pool, a health club, and numerous restaurants and
motels.

Greenville, CA:

Greenville is located in Indian Valley within Plumas County. With only
eight people per square mile and just one stoplight, Plumas County
offers a rural, four seasons, and mountain retreat type of setting.
Indian Valley, which includes the communities of Greenville,
Taylorsville, Crescent Mills and Canyon Dam, is rich in beauty and
history. Surrounded by a stunning mountain backdrop, the valley is
dotted with ranches, old barns and grazing cattle. The most alluring
aspect of this verdant meadow is its serenity. Greenville, the largest
of the communities within Indian Valley, offers a full range of
business and service establishments. It has a small rural hospital, an
elementary and high school. It is about 30 miles from Quincy, the
County Seat.

Blairsden/Graeagle/Portola, CA:

The community of Blairsden/Graeagle is located 60 miles west of Reno,
NV, and 20 miles east of Quincy at an elevation of approximately 4400
feet. Local community services include a market, hardware store,
bakery, deli, pizza parlor, one full service gas station, physician’s
clinic, dental office, post office, and several restaurants and
motels. There are four 18-hole championship and two 9-hole golf
courses within five miles of the office. Johnsville Ski Area is a
local historic downhill ski area which hosts two long board-racing
events per year as well as public downhill skiing. Rentals for a two
bedroom /two bath condominium start around $1000 per month and housing
costs for a three bedroom/two bath start around $180,000. Since
housing is expensive in the Blairsden/Graeagle area many employees
live in Portola or Quincy. The community of Portola (ten miles east of
Blairsden/Graeagle) has a population of 2,000 with services including
a hospital with physician’s clinic, a public library, one elementary
school, one middle school, one high school, a variety of churches, a
supermarket, a bowling alley, a health club, and several restaurants
and motels. Rentals for a two bedroom /one bath start around $600 per
month and housing costs for a three bedroom/two bath start around
$120,000.

The Blairsden/Graeagle, Portola, and Quincy communities offer a
variety of cultural events, and year-round sporting activities are
available for all ages in a picturesque mountain setting. The areas
have four seasons with warm days/cool nights in the summer and
periodic snowstorms in the winter. Average annual precipitation is 35
to 40 inches. Within an easy half day or less drive are Lake Tahoe,
Sacramento, Redding, Chico, Lake Shasta, Lassen Volcanic National
Park, and a vast variety of activities and opportunities.

Return the following interest form to Randy Jennings at
rcjennings@fs.fed.us with a copy of your resume or bio-sketch by June 29th

OUTREACH INTEREST FORM

Supervisory Forestry Technician (ADFMO), GS-0462-09

Plumas National Forest
Mt.Hough Ranger District

NAME: ______________________________________________________________________

E-MAIL ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________

MAILING ADDRESS: __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

TELEPHONE NUMBER: _______________________________________________________

AGENCY EMPLOYED WITH: ______USFS _____BLM ______OTHER__________

TYPE OF APPOINTMENT: ______PERMANENT _____ TEMPORARY ______ TERM

______ VRA
_____ PWD ______ OTHER

CURRENT REGION/FOREST/DISTRICT: _______________________________________________

CURRENT SERIES AND GRADE IF APPLICABLE:
____________________________________________________________________________________

CURRENT POSITION
TITLE:__________________________________________________________

WHERE DID YOU HEAR ABOUT VACANCY/OUTREACH? :
____________________________________________________________________________________

IF NOT A CURRENT PERMANENT (CAREER OR CAREER CONDITIONAL) EMPLOYEE
ARE YOU ELIGIBLE TO BE HIRED UNDER ANY OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIAL
AUTHORITIES:

______ PERSON WITH DISABILITIES
______ VETERANS READJUSTMENT
______ DISABLED VETERANS W/30% COMPENSABLE DISABILITY
______ VETERANS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ACT OF 1998
______ FORMER PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER
______ STUDENT CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM
______ OTHER
______________________________________________________________

Thank you for your interest in our Vacancy!

Visitor Center Directorship in Alaska

Natural Resources Specialist

(Visitor Center Director)

GS-0401-11 or 11/12 permanent full time

Alaska Region – Tongass National Forest

Juneau Ranger District

        Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center

         Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center,

                         Juneau, Alaska

We are conducting outreach for interested candidates for the
Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center director permanent full time
position on the Juneau Ranger District, Tongass National Forest.

To express interest in this permanent full time position, please
complete the attached Outreach Response Form and send to
mmarshall01@fs.fed.us by July 1, 2012. For additional information on
the position or the duty location, please contact Marti Marshall,
Juneau District Ranger, at (907) 789-6244.

Position Title:  Natural Resources Specialist (Mendenhall Glacier
Visitor Center Director), GS-0401-11 OR 0401-11/12*

(*The position is currently being classified; grade will be dependent
upon classification.)

Tour of Duty:  Permanent full time.

Duty Station:  Juneau, Alaska

Position Duties:  The Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center Director leads
a team of permanent, seasonal, and temporary employees to manage the
Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center and many aspects of the Mendenhall
Glacier Recreation Area.  The director is also an important part of
the joint Juneau Ranger District-Admiralty Island National Monument
staff team.  Budget, planning, and leadership skills are critical to
this position.

The Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center is located on the Juneau Ranger
District and within the Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area.  The
Visitor Center includes not only the Center but a complex of
improvements and facilities in the immediate area. This includes
parking lots, a bus shelter, pavilion, information kiosk, restrooms,
sidewalks, and the paved Photo Point Trail.   Other trails in the
vicinity include Steep Creek Interpretive trail, Trail of Time, East
Glacier, Moraine Ecology, and Nugget Falls trails. Fees have been
collected at the Visitor Center since 1999.

With approximately 500,000 visitors a year (primarily May-September),
the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center complex is one of the most
visited sites in Alaska, attracting a broad diversity of U.S. and
world visitors.  Strong partnerships with the tourism industry,
including bus companies and transporters, are keys to serving the many
visitors arriving in Juneau from cruise ships.  Other important
components of visitor center program management is the strong
conservation education program, partnerships with universities and
research related to glaciers, climate change, wildlife, and fish. The
natural and biological wonders of the landscape and the recent
increases of black and brown bears to the area (attracted to the
salmon runs in nearby Steep Creek) make managing the site both
interesting and challenging.  Generally the challenge of operating the
Center is not in attracting more visitors but rather to manage
visitors for an enjoyable and safe experience.

      Juneau-Admiralty District Office

Duty Location:

The district office is located in Juneau, Alaska.  Juneau Ranger
District and Admiralty Island National Monument staffs are co-located
at 8510 Mendenhall Loop Road, near the renowned Mendenhall Glacier.
The Visitor Center director office is at the Visitor Center,
approximately 1.5 miles away.

Area and Community Descriptions:

At over 3.5 million acres, the Juneau Ranger District is the largest
district in the nation on the largest national forest in the nation –
the Tongass, with over 17 million acres. The landscape ranges from
giant spruce forests to thundering tidewater glaciers. Juneau is the
main community within the district, with Skagway, Haines, and Gustavus
a flight or ferry ride away.

Situated on the upper Inside Passage in Southeast Alaska, Juneau is
almost 600 air miles from Anchorage and 900 miles from Seattle. Juneau
is home to roughly 31,000 year round residents.

World-class recreation opportunities abound across the district.
Juneau’s trail system is considered one of the best in Alaska. Public
use cabins are located throughout the district and provide solitude as
well as a starting point for other excursions. Excellent fishing,
wildlife viewing, and other recreational opportunities are accessible
from the Juneau road system as well as more remote locations. No stop
in Juneau is complete without a stop at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor
Center.

Travel in and out of Juneau is via air or boat. Daily jet service and
smaller commuter planes provide service to Juneau and nearby
communities. The Alaska Marine Highway ferry system connects Juneau
with other Southeast Alaska towns. Several air charter companies can
meet your transportation needs as well.

The City of Juneau is the capital of Alaska which originated as a
bustling gold mining community founded in 1880.  It is the only State
capital that cannot be reached by road.  Juneau is on the mainland,
and lies along the famed Inside Passage, which is a maze of protected
waterways weaving around over a thousand islands.  This area of the
State is commonly known as the “Southeast” or “the Panhandle”.

The Coast Range Mountains rise abruptly from the tidal flats of
Gastineau Channel making a spectacular backdrop for downtown Juneau.
The city has a population of approximately 31,000 people, and has
strong Alaska Native, Filipino, and Asian representation.  Diversity
is found in the many civic and community organizations.

Juneau is a major service center for southeast Alaska and provides a
diverse selection of employment opportunities and businesses.

Weather

Because southeast Alaska is adjacent to the North Pacific, it has a
maritime climate characterized by relatively mild, cloudy, and wet
weather.  The average daily high temperature is 29°F in January and
64°F in August. Rainfall in the district can range from 40 inches to
150 inches depending on the location, with downtown Juneau averaging
90 inches of rain a year.  The district office receives about 50
inches a year.

On the longest day of the year, the sun rises about four in the
morning and sets about ten in the evening.  On the shortest day of the
year, there are approximately six hours and forty minutes of daylight.

Tongass National Forest website:  http://www.fs.fed.us/r10/tongass/

For information on the position:

Contact Person:          Marti Marshall  , Juneau District Ranger

Phone Number(s):       (907) 789-6244

Email address(es):      mmarshall01@fs.fed.us

If you are interested in the permanent full time positions, please
complete the attached outreach form and return to Marti Marshall by
July 1.

Thank you for your interest in this position!

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service prohibits
discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability,
political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status
(not all prohibited bases apply to all programs).  Persons with
disabilities who require means for communication of program
information (Braille, large print, audiotapes, etc) should contact
USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination write:  USDA, Director, Office
of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence
Ave, SW, Washington, DC  20250-9401 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice or
TDD).  USDA Forest Service is an equal opportunity provider and
employer.

            OUTREACH NOTICE FORM

Tongass National Forest

Juneau Ranger District

Juneau, Alaska

            Title:  Natural Resources Specialist (Visitor Center
Director), GS-0401-11 OR 11/12

Tour of Duty:  Permanent Full Time.

Duty Station:  Juneau, Alaska

I am interested in a permanent full time position!             yes_____        no_____

PERSONAL INFORMATION:

Name:

Date:

Address:

Phone:

City/State:

E-Mail:

Are you currently a Federal employee:

YES

NO

If yes:

Current title/series/grade:

Current duty station location:

Type of appointment you qualify for (ex: Career, Career-Conditional,
Excepted-ANILCA, Excepted VRA, etc.)

Briefly describe why you will be a quality candidate for this position
(enter text below, and feel free to continue to the next page if
needed):

Visual Impacts In Parks: Jet Contrails in Denali National Park

We can use simulated ranges of conditions to learn about visitor preferences.  Below, I show a series of images I developed to depict one potential aesthetic impact to wilderness recreation.  It is a nice, reliable, quantitative, repeatable technique for basing difficult and controversial management decisions on data.  Often used in people per viewscape/shed (PPV) and people at one time (PAOT) crowding measures.

Not sure how it works for protecting your park, forest or refuge? Contact my research group.

ZERO CONTRAILS VISIBLE

 

FEW CONTRAILS VISIBLE

 

SOME CONTRAILS VISIBLE

 

MORE CONTRAILS VISIBLE

 

MANY CONTRAILS VISIBLE

 

VERY MANY CONTRAILS VISIBLE

 

Pretty cool, huh?

Enhancing visual research with computer animation: A study of crowding-related standards of quality for the loop road at Acadia National Park

Attached is a presentation for a research project I developed with my colleagues and friends at the UVM Park Studies Lab.  Great project using computer animation to simulate a range of visitor experiences along Acadia National Park’s Ocean Drive loop road.  You can use associated video clips in the same way that simulated photos are used to depict crowding conditions at parks and other protected areas.

 

Not sure how it works?  Contact my research group.

Enhancing visual research with computer animation: A study of crowding-related standards of quality for the loop road at Acadia National Park

Instructions for producing this sort of computer animation are here; I constructed them when I was a graduate student: Animating Vehicle Scenes in Poser

Measuring Soil Loss/Erosion on Trails

Erosion at Haleakala National ParkSoil erosion is a major concern in parks, wilderness areas, forests and other protected areas devoted to recreation. As a primary effect of over-intensive recreation and historic land use, erosion is a perennial target for management efforts.

Measuring soil erosion along a trail is a fairly straightforward process, but requires careful bookkeeping– the field staff generate tons of data. To get an idea of the process, take a look at a tool I’ve developed to aid in cross sectional area (CSA) soil loss measurement.

Like any tool, it can be misused without proper instruction. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Disclaimer aside, enjoy–

CSA Calculator Power Tool

If you like it, I’d really appreciate a link to this post on your website. Suggestions for powertool improvement are always welcome.

Logan