Forest Rec Summer Camp

AKA FOR 422C: Park and Wildland Management Camp

Itinerary

DateOrigin
Location
Morning
Destination
Monday,
May 13,
2019
Carbondale
Campus
Skills &
Safety
Tuesday,
May 14,
2019
Carbondale
Campus
Forest
Hydro
Wednesday,
May 15,
2019
On the roadOn the road
Thursday,
May 16,
2019
Great Sand
Dunes National
Park & Preserve
Great Sand
Dunes National
Park & Preserve
Friday,
May 17,
2019
Great Sand
Dunes National
Park & Preserve
Rio Grande
National Forest:
Zapata Falls
Saturday,
May 18,
2019
Rio Grande
National Forest:
Zapata Falls
Rio Grande
National Forest:
Zapata Falls
Sunday,
May 19,
2019
Rio Grande
National Forest:
Zapata Falls
Grand Canyon
National Park
Monday,
May 20,
2019
Grand Canyon
National Park
Grand Canyon
National Park
Tuesday,
May 21,
2019
Grand Canyon
National Park
Grand Canyon
National Park
Wednesday,
May 22,
2019
Grand Canyon
National Park
Grand Canyon
National Park
Thursday,
May 23,
2019
Grand Canyon
National Park
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Friday,
May 24,
2019
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Saturday,
May 25,
2019
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Sunday,
May 26,
2019
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Monday,
May 27,
2019
Kaibab
National Forest
North Plateau
Zion
National Park
Tuesday,
May 28,
2019
Zion
National Park
Zion
National Park
Wednesday,
May 29,
2019
Zion
National Park
Zion
National Park
Thursday,
May 30,
2019
Zion
National Park
Zion
National Park
Friday,
May 31,
2019
Zion
National Park
Arches and
Moab
Saturday,
June 1,
2019
Arches and
Moab
Arches and
Moab
Sunday,
June 2,
2019
Arches and
Moab
Arches and
Moab
Monday,
June 3,
2019
Arches and
Moab
Rocky Mtn
National Park
Tuesday,
June 4,
2019
Rocky Mtn
National Park
Rocky Mtn
National Park
Wednesday,
June 5,
2019
Rocky Mtn
National Park
Rocky Mtn
National Park
Thursday,
June 6,
2019
Rocky Mtn
National Park
On the road
Friday,
June 7,
2019
On the roadOn the road

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How much does summer camp cost?
    • 6 x [cost per credit hour], to the bursar
    • $500 to 750 course fee (gas, permits), to the bursar
    • $1-2 per meal per day (75-150), to the grocery store
    • $10 in quarters for laundry & coin-op showers along the way, to the laundromat
    • $X for spending money, souvenirs, restaurants; to the business
    • $0 to Dr. Park

  • Where should I park?
    • Best answer: have a friend drop you off and avoid the hassle.
    • Next best answer:
      • Email Dr. Park your car’s:
        • Make & Model
        • Color
        • Plate state & number 
        • SIU parking sticker number if applicable
        • We will park precisely here and email your car’s info to parking services.
  • Can I bring my dog? S/he is perfect and the love of my life.
    • Hard no. Doges create all sorts of rec impacts when off-leash and pose a sanitation problem to your classmates. I can’t fairly allow you to bring your dog into extended close quarters with them during a professional trip.
    • Ok but seriously my dog is amazing and I love him/her. “lol”
      • Negative.
    • No, you don’t understand; it’s my therapy dog, Dr. Park.
      • Proper, legally trained service animals are always allowed everywhere their companion humans are, under federal law. If it’s a working dog wearing the vest, actually trained, behaving, and assisting you through a medically diagnosed condition, bring it with my blessing. Therapy animals are not service animals and canot join this class. Repeat: not the same creature, not the same role, not coming on this trip.
      • If you got your dog a fake vest on Amazon and try to foist that on us, Dr. Park will be “legit” displeased. Don’t ruin this for the people who need the services of a true trained service animal.

  • I have [insert social obligation here]; can I join rec summer camp LATE?
    • Probably not. Take it next summer if you’re missing more than 1 day. Talk to Dr. Park specifically, directly, and immediately about it.
  • I have [insert social obligation here]; can I part from rec summer camp EARLY?
    • Maaaaybe if it’s along our planned route for this year. Talk to Dr. Park specifically, directly, and immediately about it.

  • Is This Going To Be The Greatest Class Ever?
    • Yes, definitely

Gear / Packing List

Gear List Preamble: Common Sense

  1. Replace gear with skill only as appropriate
    1. Share gear among your classmates to reduce pack loadout
    2. First Aid/WFR certs are a great asset
    3. Insects will be an issue on this trip: blackflies, horseflies, and ticks should be “impressive” given the mild winter
    4. When it comes to total pack weight, less is more, but refer back to #1!
  2. Secondhand stores help you save TONS of money on clothing especially:
    1. Goodwill, Salvation Army, thrift closets
      1. http://shopgoodwill.com/
    2. Thredup.com, swap.com
    3. Army/Navy, Army surplus stores have heavy duty, inexpensive gear when running sales
    4. REI, Patagonia, North Face all operate refurbished high quality lines now.
      1. REI Used: https://www.rei.com/used/shop/gear
      2. REI Garage (Returned Items): https://www.rei.com/rei-garage
      3. Patagonia
        1. Sale stuff: https://www.patagonia.com/shop/web-specials
        2. Steep and Cheap Patagonia: https://www.steepandcheap.com/rc/patagonia-on-sale
  3. Purchase only things you intend to use beyond this class; rent, borrow ALL the rest!

Pack: Required – padding & support for your load, 4000+ in3 (about 65 to 90 Liters) capacity

  • Pack rain protection
    • Silnylon (silicone-impregnated nylon) exterior rain cover
    • Park’s Pick: heavy duty trash compactor bags stuffed into your pack and sleeping bag compartment as interior rain barrier
    • Stuffsacks/drybags – Ziploc bags tend to burst open, mesh bags rip easily
      • Ripstop
      • Silnylon or other waterproofing
      • Can use drybags but these are usually heavierrubberized canvas

Basic Safety: Required

  • Cellphone (bring but never rely on electronics)
    • Load any apps you believe you’ll need
      • Preload map data into Google Maps, AllTrails, etc. on wifi
    • Charger
      • Have a way to charge it from a vehicle (12V cigarette adapter)
    • Charging cable
      • Label your charging cable with electrical tape before we go
    • Charger solar panels are expensive, fragile, and heavy, but oh so nice
  • Maps
    • Dr. Park will provide each backpacking group the major maps they will need
    • You can create and print free topo maps for any of our destinations using any of a variety of websites
  • Compass
    • Fluid-damped is nice but expensive
    • Adjustable declination is nice
  • Flashlight/headlamp
    • Spare batteries
    • Means to charge your headlamp if it has a built-in lithium battery.. typically a USB cable
  • First Aid kit
    • Sterile bandages
    • Triangular bandage, useful for splinting
    • Topical sterilizer/hand sanitizer
    • Polysporin
    • CPR mask for preventing ingestion of the patient’s vomit while providing rescue breathing 
    • Rubber gloves
    • Moleskin
    • Trainer tape for managing blisters and hotspots
    • Do not bring a tourniquet unless you are trained/certified in its use
  • Pocket knife or multi-tool
    • Large, hollow-handled survival knives are notoriously fragile because they lack full tang construction
    • Small Swiss army-style knives are most common for this class
    • Leatherman-style multi-tools are nice if you have them, but expensive and heavy.  Your choice to bring.
    • Machetes are complete overkill for this class but you do you.
  • Waterproof matches in watertight case
  • Firestarter – lighters, firesteel, waterproof matches: carry redundant alternatives
    • It’s completely fine if a butane lighter is empty as long as it still sparks.
  • Pealess plastic emergency whistle
    • The pea inside normal whistles can freeze in cold weather and stop the whistle from working when you need it most
  • Watch
    • It will be difficult for us to keep your smartwatch charged on this trip
  • Personal medications, health insurance info
  • Emergency contact/medical sheet filled out & handed in to Dr. Park

Sun protection: Required

  • Sunglasses
    • Must be UV-rated
    • Optionally polarized for cutting down solar glare
    • Recommended securing neck strap
  • Sunblock
    • SPF 30 and up
    • Broad spectrum recommended (certified for UVA and UVB radiation)
    • Unscented only, for your safety in bear country. No “fragrance” or “parfum” ingredients please.
  • SPF lip balm
    • SPF 30 and up
    • Broad spectrum recommended (certified for UVA and UVB radiation)
    • Non-flavored only, for your safety in bear country. No “fragrance” or “parfum” ingredients please.
  • Sun hat
    • Optionally treated for water repellency
    • Hydrophobic synthetic material
      • Wide brim
      • Skirted baseball cap, never a regular baseball cap. The desert sun wants to kill you nad is stronger than a ballcap or trucker (mesh) cap.
      • Baseball caps not permitted for desert hiking in this class

Water

  • Purification method
    • Prefilter w/bandanna or reusable metal coffee filter to remove the wriggling and chew-sized chunks
    • Filter: e.g., MSR/PUR brands
    • Chemical treatment – tablets or drops, chlorine dioxide or iodine
      • Aqua Mira brand
      • Chlorine bleach in eyedropper bottle
      • Katadyn dissolvable tablets
      • Iodine + vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
      • Mioxx-style electrolytic reactor using table salt
    • Boiling:can use the class-provided camp stoves and pots for this.
      • Very fuel intensive
      • Tastes bad
      • Slow
      • Ineffective at high altitude
    •  UV treatment: e.g., Steri-pen brand
      • Quick but expensive
      • Requires batteries
  • Water storage and hauling – 4 to 6 quart or liter total capacity
    • Lexan/HDPE rigid plastic bottles
      • Can be cheap Aquafina wide-mouth bottles or similar
      • Polycarbonate bottles like Lexan/Nalgene cannot be used to store or transport hot liquids in this class
    • Bladder + hose (Camelbak, Dromedary and similar brands)
      • Dr. Park will provide Dromedary bags for desert travel

Cook kit

  • Scouring pad – e.g., scotchbrite
    • Stove
      • Dr. Park will provide MSR Whisperlite white gas stoves
      • Dr. Park will provide MSR white gas 1L fuel bottles
      • Dr. Park will provide white gas
      • Dr. Park will provide MSR Whisperlite field repair kits
      • Dr. Park will provide MSR cook pots, pans, and lids
    • Eating utensils
      • Fork/knife/spoon/spork
      • Chopsticks
      • Pocketknife
    • Hot pad/pot gripper
      • Typically silicone or layered cotton
    • Ziploc bags
    • 40’ paracord – repairs and bear-bagging
      • 550-rating is usual, you may select the test weight of your line as preferred
      • Some varieties include retroreflective thread for easy spotting with a headlamp at night
    • Dish soap
    • Biodegradable only, especially for desert travel
    • Unscented only for your safety in bear country
    • Bandanna for drying
    • Recommend cotton, but keep it clean; mildew loves cotton and hates you

Clothing – No cotton/jeans anywhere, anytime except on the bus for travel days.  Bring more than 1 outfit.

  • Base layer – silk-weight thermal top and bottom if you sleep cold
    • Long-sleeves top and bottom
    • Under Armour style
    • Military surplus works fine as an inexpensive alternative
    • Undergarments (3) 
      • Compression shorts
      • Under Armour & generic brand variants
    • Thermal layer
      • fleece sweater
      • Puffy jacket
      • Fleece pants or overalls if we are anticipating cold weather
    • Full body hooded rain gear – doubles as outer thermal + wind-blocking layer
      • Coat or poncho
      • Rain pants
    • Hiking socks (3 to 5 pair)
      • Polypropylene dress socks, often used as liner socks (slippery, help to prevent blisters)
      • Wool, often used as thermal and cushioning layer
    • Main layer: 
      • Pants (up to 2) – should be bug/bite-proof, convertible from long pants to shorts
      • Shirts (up to 2) – should be bug/bite-proof, convertible from long-sleeves to short-sleeves
    • Footwear – waterproofed and broken in before we begin
      • Hiking boots
        • High ankle for maximum support and waterproofing
        • Mid ankle
        • Low ankle for lighter boot and faster drying
    • Trail running shoes
      • Must have full plastic last construction (NO cardboard or fabric lasts)
      • Toe shoes
        • Five fingers, vibram, etc.
        • Require dedicated toe socks as well
    • Optional camp shoes
      • Sandals, running shoes, crocs, etc.
      • Emergency temporary backup if your boot or shoe fails
    • Gaiters – keep rocks, cactus needles, and goatheads out of your footwear
      • Low gaiters are light but slip around easily
      • High gaiters are very effective but heavier and more expensive
    • Modest swim gear – for those rare opportunistic bathing opportunities while on the road
    • Gloves
      • Fleece thermal gloves
      • Lightweight full-finger sun/liner gloves
    • Thermal hat
      • Beanie
      • Toque
      • Toboggan cap
      • Balaclava
      • Ski mask

Insect management

  • You may be miserable on this trip without effective bug management
    • Bite-proof clothing
    • Flea/tick collars for sleeves and ankles, as used in military applications
    • Bug dope – DEET, picaridin, eucalyptol or other alternative
    • Bug netting – full-body isn’t a terrible idea
    • Tough it out – this is a bad life plan for you

Shelter: Required

  • Tent/Tarp/Hammock/Bivouac sack
    • rated for 3 season use
    • Double walled recommended
    • If using a hammock, you must be able to pitch it on the ground as a tent for places without trees 
    • If using a hammock you must bring treesaver straps (nylon load-distribution straps to protect tree cambium)
  • Sleeping bag
    • Synthetic- or down-filled, never cotton batting-filled
    • Survival rated to 20 degrees
    • Can be any comfort rating, must meet survival rating above
  • Optional sleeping bag liner 
    • Silk or synthetic
    • Never cotton
    • Extends the working life of your sleeping bag by shielding it from your grime
  • Sleeping bag stuff sack
    • Waterproof strongly recommended
    • trash bags work fine
    • Compression sacks are nice but can destroy a sleeping bag’s insulation
  • Sleeping pad
    • Closed cell foam 
    • Never open-cell foam
    • Inflatable pads are more comfortable but pop easily and require repair
  • Extra tent stakes
    • Useful with outdoor tape or lashing as a tent pole splint for broken poles
    • Enough to stake your tent down completely in a 50-mph wind or hail storm

Hygiene

  • Mouth: Optional but come on
    • Toothpaste
      • Unflavored for your safety in bear country, or
      • bear bagged with food every night, or
      • Locked in vehicle every night
    • Floss
      • Unflavored for your safety in bear country, or
      • bear bagged with food every night, or
      • Locked in vehicle every night
    • Mouthwash
      • Unflavored, for your safety in bear country, or
        bear bagged with food every night, or
        Locked in vehicle every night
  • Soap: Required
    • Biodegradable only, especially for desert travel
    • Camp soap is highly concentrated, suggest dropwise use
    • Unscented for your safety in bear country, or
    • bear bagged with food every night, or
    • Locked in vehicle every night
  • Shampoo: Optional but come on
    • Unscented for your safety in bear country, or
    • bear bagged with food every night, or
    • Locked in vehicle every night
  • Spare contact lenses and kit: Required if you need them to be safe
    • If needed
    • Bring glasses in hard-case as backup
    • Desert windborne grit eats contacts

Educational

  • Pencils, not pens: Required
  • Write in the Rain paper: Required
    • Buy field notebook larger than memo pad
    • look online for cheap DIY alternatives like Tyvek homewrap sheets
  • Digital camera: Optional
    • Waterproof, padded case

Repair kit: Optional

  • Large bore needle for repairing heavy outdoor fabrics like 1000-denier backpack nylon
  • Repair cements
    • Seam Grip
    • Barge Cement
    • Shoe Goo
    • SilNet
    • Binary epoxy cement
  • Patch kit 
    • Tent
    • Rain gear
    • Inflatable sleeping mat
    • (must match repair kit to item’s fabric type, they don’t all work on all fabrics)
  • Paracord
    • 550 is standard, choose whatever test strength you need
  • Repair tape
    • Duct tape
    • Gorilla tape
    • Other waterproof field tapes
  • Stove repair kit
    • Currently provided by Forestry Department
  • Cyanoacrylate superglue 
  • Huge safety pins
    • Most commonly diaper pins

Food: Required

  • Everyone brings the foods they like for about 25 days. MUCH cheaper if you buy stuff in bulk and on sale in advance. Shoot for $1 or less per meal.
  • We’ll stop for resupplies along the way for fresh goods. This is more expensive; budget according to your palate.
  • Curry packs, about 15 varieties available at International Grocery in Murdale Shopping Center. Already prepared, never spoil, heat and eat. Usually are buy-one-get-one-free.
  • Bulk whole grains at the Neighborhood Co-op Grocery in Murdale:
    • Steel-cut oats (never eat instant rolled oats as they are pure sugar)
    • Quinoa (pronounced “KEEN wah”)
  • Powdered milk: NIDO brand is slightly less awful than most kinds.
  • Powdered eggs
  • Breakfast drink mix: never mix into your hydration bladder, avoid culturing black mold.
  • Gorp (nuts, seeds, dried fruit, m&ms), can buy in bulk at the Neighborhood Co-Op in Murdale shopping center
  • Hard Cheese (cheese with less moisture content lasts longer before rotting in summer heat)
  • Jerky (beef/turkey/seitan) or salami
  • Cookies, not recommended
  • Whole Grain crackers
  • Tiger’s Milk Bars
  • Licorice Sticks
  • Kudos
  • Bear Valley MealPacks
  • PowerBars (Berry)
  • Chewing Gum
  • Gatorade: never mix into your hydration bladder, avoid culturing black mold.
  • Bagels, English muffins, recommend whole grain
  • String cheese (individually wrapped)
  • Hard candies that won’t melt in your mouth OR in your hand
  • Dried fruit (raisins, apples, pears, peaches, bananas)
  • Dried meat and fish
  • Giant hard pretzels, whole grain recommended
  • Raw fruit / vegetables, restock along the way
  • Mixed Nuts
  • Pop Tarts, not recommended as they are pure sugar and will make you feelsbadman.gif
  • Fig/Peach/Apple Newtons
  • Hot chocolate 
  • Instant Hot Cider
  • 3-minute steel cut Oatmeal (variety); do NOT bring instant microwave oatmeal
  • Instant Cream of Wheat
  • Malt O’ Meal (w/brown sugar)
  • Granola
  • Nature Valley Granola bars (variety)
  • Freeze dried meals, expensive but easy and nice
  • Spice kit
  • Soup mixes
  • Squeeze butter
  • Foil pack seafood, recommend a variety of flavors you like
  • Pita bread, recommend whole grain
  • Pemmican, buffalo sticks
  • Dry cheeses
  • Tortillas, recommend whole grain
  • Squeeze jelly, peanut butter, honey
  • Instant or French-press coffee (bring your nonelectric coffeemaker if you want to)
  • Tea bags
  • Hard candy
  • Powdered drink mixes: never mix into your hydration bladder, avoid culturing black mold.

Misc Optional items

  • Hiking sticks/staff
  • Bandanna/towel
  • Sit pad – can be combined with sleeping pad
  • Binoculars/spotting scope
  • GPS/altimeter
  • Musical instruments – small travel or rugged versions tend to survive a little better
  • Earplugs if you’re a light sleeper
  • Playing cards
  • Camp shoes or sandals
  • Personal locator beacon or satellite phone
  • Breadbags for waterproofing soaked shoes on a temporary, emergency basis
  • Joint supports as necessary – knee brace, ankle brace
  • Buff 
  • Signal mirror, doubling as a shave mirror
  • Safety razors
  • Camp pillow
  • Fishing gear and rugged case – proper tools and license(s) required if you bring this gear
  • Ibuprofen/acetaminophen/naproxen sodium/aspirin or similar non-steroidal anti-inflammatory
  • Immodium or similar anti-diarrheal
  • Styptic bandages or powder to temporary halt difficult bleeding. Know how or becertified to use these if you decide to bring.
  • Benadryl or other antihistamine
  • *we can’t strictly advise you to bring any medications, these suggestions are entirely at your option and assume you know how to dose yourself safely.
  • *same goes for other medical supplies, like splints and styptic powder